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In This Edition

 

CEO Report: Australian Business Week in India (ABWI)

Streamlining Direct Adoptions of International Standards

World’s First Compliance Management Standard Published

Participate in JTC 1 Working Groups on “Big Data” and the “Internet of Things”

For Public Comment: Revision to Australian Standards on General Conditions of Contract and Lifejackets

CEN and CENELEC Work Programme 2015

AIIA Summit: “Navigating the Internet of Things”

Forum: Protective Helmets for Vehicle Users

Forum: Harness Anchors

 

Accessing the Free Online National Construction Code 2015

Standards Australia Road Show: Prioritisation Process and Focus for 2015

Register Now for Standards Australia Drafting Leaders Workshops

10th Round of Project Prioritisation Open Now

Updates to KPIs for Standards Development Projects

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

CEO Report: Australian Business Week in India (ABWI)


 
In the second week of January 2015 I joined the Australian Business Week in India (ABWI) led by Andrew Robb, Minister for Trade and Investment as part of the Transport Road Safety Program.

This was the largest ever trade mission to India with over 450 business leaders participating in 14 programs across 7 cities, joining 121 different events and requiring 170 transport movements. An extraordinary feat of organisation that was managed superbly by the Austrade staff in India and Australia.

Equally extraordinary is the dynamism of the Indian economy and the palpable sense of optimism in India at the moment. As the Australian Financial Review (AFR) reported on 21 January 2015, India’s economy is expected to grow by 6.5% in 2016 and 7% in 2017. But growth at these levels does not come without challenges. The pressure on India’s roads infrastructure is especially immense.

It was sobering to consider the Indian road safety statistics and why it is such an important focus area for India – socially, economically and politically. India has an annual road toll in excess of 140,000 fatalities and over 500,000 injuries, with appropriately half of the deaths being vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists. This represents 10% of global road fatalities, even though India has just over 1% of the world’s vehicle population. The International Road Federation estimates the annual economic impact of the road traffic injuries to be in excess of 33 billion US dollars, or over 2% of India’s GDP.

But many organisations are working hard to make a difference.

During the week the Transport Road Safety Group visited the Centre Road Research Institute (CRRI) in Delhi, the premier research organisation for highway traffic and transport planning. The CRRI has advanced research capabilities such as accelerated life testing for road surfaces, Indian-relevant driver simulation systems and emissions testing equipment.

Another impressive organisation was the Institute of Road Traffic Education (IRTE) based in Faridabad, Haryana. This is a not-for-profit organisation formed by an interdisciplinary group of members including teachers, doctors, journalists, engineers, ex-servicemen and women, architects, automotive experts and members of the police force, with the sole aim of making Indian roads safer for those who use them.

Many speakers raised the importance of standards. And in the area of road user safety, Australia has many world-leading standards, including AS/NZS 1754:2013 Child restraint systems for use in motor vehicles.

Similarly, many ISO standards are important in this area of traffic safety, including ISO 39001:2012 Road traffic safety (RTS) management systems – Requirements with guidance for use developed by ISO/TC 241, as well as the suite of intelligent transport systems standards developed by ISO/TC 204.

During the week I had the opportunity to meet with the Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS), the National Standards Body for India. Like Standards Australia, they believe standards have a valuable role to play in facilitating trade and innovation.

After participating in ABWI, I can only agree with Minister Robb’s quote from the AFR article of January 21, 2015: “There is something special going on in India… Australia is looking forward to being a part of this very important period in India’s re-emergence as a significant power.”

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

Streamlining Direct Adoptions of International Standards


In line with our mission to develop contemporary, internationally-aligned Standards and our commitment to simplifying our processes, we have taken steps to streamline identical (direct text) adoption of international standards.

Standards Australia will now accept and assess proposals for identical adoptions of international standards at any time throughout the year, even outside of our twice-yearly Project Prioritisation Rounds. This only applies to identical adoptions without modifications to the text. Proposals to adopt international standards with modifications will have to go through the Project Prioritisation process.

All proposals will still be assessed against the criteria of net benefit and stakeholder support. Further information may be found on the "Proposing a Project" page on our website.

World’s First Compliance Management Standard Published


What is compliance management?

Generally, the intended goal of compliance management is for companies to ensure they fulfil all laws and regulations in how they manage their business, staff and customers.

ISO published the world's first standard on compliance management in December 2014. Standards Australia played a key role in the development of this Standard by running the secretariat of the project committee ISO/PC 271, Compliance management systems, which was responsible for producing the publication.

ISO 19600 Compliance Management Systems - Guidelines is intended to assist in mitigating the business risk of non-compliance. In partnership with stakeholders such as the Governance Risk Compliance (GRC) Institute, Australia was able to lead the world in developing this ground-breaking international compliance Standard with twelve participating member nations.

More information available from our News Room.

Participate in JTC 1 Working Groups on “Big Data” and the “Internet of Things”


 
The Joint Technical Committee 1 (JTC 1) of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) provides an environment where experts come together to develop worldwide standards in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for business and consumer applications.

“Big Data” and the “Internet of Things” have been identified as two important focus areas for JTC 1. Working groups on the two subject areas have been established.

Working Group 9 on Big Data will be led by Convenor Mr Wo Chang, digital data advisor for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Information Technology Laboratory (ITL). WG 9 will serve as the focus of JTC 1's Big Data standardisation program and develop foundational standards – including reference architecture and vocabulary standards – to guide future work within JTC 1 on big data.

IoT refers to the use of communications technology to offer advanced connectivity between devices, systems and services, including everyday devices. Working Group 10 on the Internet of Things (IoT) will be led by Convenor Mr. Sangkeun Yoo of KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology). WG 10 will focus on developing foundational standards upon which other JTC 1 standards can be developed. WG 10 will continue the work begun in the JTC 1 Special Working Group (SWG) on IoT, focusing on standardisation gaps and monitoring IoT regulatory, market, and technology requirements.

Participation is open for Australian industry experts who are interested in actively contributing to standardisation in Big Data and the Internet of Things. For further information, contact Jenny Mance, JTC 1 Project Manager: jenny.mance@standards.org.au

For Public Comment: Revision to Australian Standards on General Conditions of Contract and Lifejackets


AS 11000 General conditions of contract

Australian Standards 2124 and 4000 provide guidance and suggested language to be used in legal contracts. The Standards are voluntary and are used widely by institutions, governments and businesses across Australia. They underpin many contracts for construction and public works projects.

The Standards are now undergoing a major revision, in consultation with many stakeholders such as the Australasian Procurement and Construction Council, AustRoads, Australian Industry Group and the Civil Contractors Federation, to name a few. Under the proposed revision, the Standards are to be combined into a new Standard, AS 11000 General conditions of contract. The objective of AS 11000 is to provide general guidance for legal contracts in all sectors of industry, including construction, engineering, health, manufacturing and infrastructure.

Given the current Standards’ widespread use and potential impact on future contracts, Standards Australia invites public comment on the draft AS 11000. The public comment period began on Friday 23 January and ends Friday 27 March 2015.

All draft Standards for public comment, along with instructions on how to comment, can be found on our "Drafts Open for Public Comment" page.

Further information on AS 11000 is available from our News Room.

AS 4758 Lifejackets

Standards Australia Technical Committee CS-060, Buoyancy aids, is currently revising AS 4758–2008 Personal flotation devices. The revised series will be renamed AS 4758 Lifejackets and be comprised of Part 1: General Requirements; Part 2: Requirements and test methods; and Part 3: Test methods.

The objective of AS 4758 is to provide manufacturers, regulatory authorities and wearers with the requirements for lifejackets suitable for use by persons engaged in activities in or near water.

The main proposed changes to AS 4758 include an addition of a new L25 buoyancy category for competent swimmers for specialist activities; new requirements for a body mass of between 5 and 10 kg, and harmonisation of buoyancy requirements with international standards. Other proposed changes include updated technical requirements and performance test methods.

Standards Australia invites public comment on the proposed revisions to AS 4758. The public comment period started on Friday 30 January and will close on Friday 3 April 2015.

All draft Standards for public comment, along with instructions on how to comment, can be found on our "Drafts Open for Public Comment" page.

Further information on AS 4758 is available from our News Room.

CEN and CENELEC Work Programme 2015


 
The European Committee for Standardization (CEN) and the European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization (CENELEC), have published their work program for 2015 online.

The CEN and CENELEC Work Programme 2015 provides an overview of their most important standardisation activities this year. These standardisation activities respond to market needs, and in particular to the demands of European industry. They also correspond to the European Union’s annual work program for European standardisation for 2015.

This year’s edition also includes specific details about the number of standards that have been published by CEN and/or CENELEC.

The CEN and CENELEC Work Programme 2015 can be downloaded in PDF format from the Publications page of the CEN-CENELEC website.

AIIA Summit: “Navigating the Internet of Things”


 
Each year, the Australian Information and Industry Association (AIIA) hosts a ‘Navigating Summit’ to explore the value that cutting edge technology can bring to Australia and Australian government policy. This series is designed to facilitate discussion on issues relevant to the ICT industry and government in Australia.

On 26 March 2015, at the National Convention Centre in Canberra, the AIIA will shine a spotlight on the Internet of Things (IoT). The overall theme of AIIA’s 2015 Summit is transformation – the profound transformative impact of ubiquitous and intelligent ‘connectivity’ on the economy, society, business and government.

Key speakers include:
Lutz Heuser, CEO of the Urban Institute in Germany;
Glenn Archer, VP Public Sector Gartner; and
Ros Harvey, Chief Strategy Advisor, Sirca, formerly the Director of the Sense-T project, Australia’s IoT initiative originating from Tasmania.

Andrew Johnstone-Burt from Deloitte will moderate a lively hypothetical discussion on the Internet of Things at the dinner to follow the Summit day event. A panel of expert opinion leaders will round out an entertaining evening of spirited debate with a focus on the challenges and risks presented by ubiquitous online technology.

To register and to find more information, visit the AIIA website

Forum: Protective Helmets for Vehicle Users


 
The deadline to register for the forum on Protective Helmets for Vehicle Users has been extended. Register today to have your voice heard.

Stakeholders and interested parties are invited to participate in a forum that will highlight the development opportunities with AS/NZS 1698:2006 Protective helmets for vehicle users, and work towards finding an acceptable solution for industry, consumers, regulators and government authorities.

Having regard to the issues in this area, our discussions will focus on:
International and regional harmonisation;
Regulatory harmonisation across jurisdictions; and
A range of other matters related to safety, certification and supply.

Attendees will hear from guest speakers on the issues facing the motorcycle industry and have the opportunity to contribute to this discussion.

Date: Thursday 19 February 2015
Time: 9:30 am to 2:00 pm
Venue: Standards Australia, Level 10, 20 Bridge Street, Sydney
RSVP: This is a complimentary forum and places are limited. To confirm your attendance, please RSVP by Friday 6 February to nsm@standards.org.au providing your name, organisation and email address details.

Light lunch to be provided – please advise of any specific dietary requirements by RSVP.

For further information please contact Alison Scotland, National Sector Manager, on 02 9237 6088 or alison.scotland@standards.org.au

Forum: Harness Anchors


 
The deadline to register for this forum has been extended. Register today to have your voice heard.

We invite our key stakeholders to participate in a forum that will highlight the current concerns with AS/NZS 5532:2013 Manufacturing requirements for single-point anchor device used for harness-based work at height and work towards finding an acceptable solution for industry, consumers, regulators and government authorities.

Our discussions will focus on:
Identification of key issues;
Exploration of options that meet industry needs; and
Agreement on work program.

Stakeholders are invited to hear from experts on the issues facing the working at height industry and contribute to this discussion. We look forward to your attendance.

Date: Thursday 12 February 2015
Time: 9:30 am to 3:00 pm, registration from 9:00 am
Venue: Standards Australia, Level 10, 20 Bridge Street, Sydney
RSVP: Places are limited. To confirm your attendance, please RSVP by Friday 6 February to nsm@standards.org.au providing your name, organisation and email address details.

Lunch to be provided – please advise of any specific dietary requirements by RSVP.

For further information please contact Jennifer Harwood, Senior National Sector Manager, on 02 9237 6041 or jennifer.harwood@standards.org.au

Accessing the Free Online National Construction Code 2015


On 30 May 2014, the Australian Building Ministers’ Forum agreed in principle to make the 2015 National Construction Code (NCC) and future editions freely available online, significantly contributing to reducing the burden of building regulation. The decision to eliminate costs associated with buying the code will make it more accessible to both small business and the building and plumbing industries.

Information on pre-registering for NCC 2015, options for obtaining hard copy editions of the code and answers to frequently asked questions are provided in Issue 13 of The Australian Building Regulation Bulletin (PDF).

Pre-registration for free access
Users can now pre-register for free access to the 2015 edition of the NCC, which will be available online and as a PDF from 1 February 2015 in readiness for when it takes effect on 1 May 2015. To pre-register, go to the home page of ABCB www.abcb.gov.au. Upon pre-registering you will be provided with a password and access details.

Pre-registration only takes a couple of minutes to complete and will help ensure your immediate access to the NCC from 1 February 2015.

Information Seminars on the NCC 2015 Amendments
The ABCB are organising a series of Information Seminars on the NCC 2015 Amendments, commencing February 2015, in a capital city near you. Standards Australia will also be presenting on the relevant building and construction Standards that have been referenced in the revised code.

Members of the building and construction industry should take the opportunity to find out what changes are coming into effect. The seminars will also provide more information on verification methods being introduced, the new NCC Performance Requirements extract publication, and the new Guideline for performance-based design.

To register and find out more information visit the ABCB website.

Standards Australia Road Show: Prioritisation Process and Focus for 2015


 
Standards Australia is conducting information seminars providing an update on our operations over the past year, future direction and updates to processes such as project proposals and Committee Member Deeds, in all capital cities in February and March 2015. This will be an opportunity for stakeholders to speak to a National Sector Manager to learn more about the process involved in developing proposals.

 
Brisbane Thursday 12 February
Cliftons Brisbane, Level 3, 288 Edward Street
10am – 12pm
Canberra Tuesday 17 February
Cliftons Canberra, Level 2, 10 Moore Street
2pm – 4pm
Hobart Friday 20 February
Hotel Grand Chancellor, 1 Davey Street
10am – 12pm
Sydney Friday 20 February
Standards Australia, Level 10, 20 Bridge Street
10am – 12pm
Darwin Thursday 26 February
Mantra On The Esplanade, 88 The Esplanade
2pm – 4pm
Melbourne Monday 2 March
Cliftons Melbourne, Level 1, 440 Collins Street
2pm – 4pm
Perth Tuesday 3 March
Cliftons Perth, Pamelia House, Ground Floor, 191 St Georges Terrace
2pm – 4pm
Adelaide Monday 16 March
Cliftons Adelaide, Level 1, 80 King William Street
2pm – 4pm

Please RSVP your attendance at the Road Show to mail@standards.org.au indicating your chosen city and date.
 
     
 
 

Register Now for Standards Australia Drafting Leaders Workshops


Standards Australia has announced Drafting Leaders Workshops for Committee Members in 2015, scheduled for Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra and Perth.

The aim of these workshops is to increase knowledge amongst Committee Members in relation to the writing styles and structure of Standards documents. Committee Members who have accepted a Drafting Leader role within their committees or who participate in the Standards development process will benefit most from these workshops.

Click here for the details and registration form.

Places fill quickly, so be quick to ensure you don’t miss out.

10th Round of Project Prioritisation Open Now


Australian Standards are living documents that reflect progress in science, technology and systems. To maintain their currency, all Standards are periodically reviewed, and new editions are published. Between editions, amendments may be issued.

Standards Australia welcomes proposals to amend, revise or develop new Australian Standards. The 10th round of project prioritisation opened on 2 February 2015 and closes on 18 March 2015. The projects will be considered by the Standards Development Committee (SDC) at its April meeting.

Read more about the process on our website, or speak to one of our National Sector Managers.

Updates to KPIs for Standards Development Projects


As part of our continued efforts to streamline processes, Standards Australia has updated our Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for the maximum allowed duration of Standards development projects to reduce duplication and to emphasise the following:

Maximum recommended active durations are different according to and dependent on the complexity of the project.
A project classified as ‘simple’ would have a total maximum active duration of 8 months while a ‘complex’ project would have a total maximum active duration of 48 months. The table below sets out the targets and limits of active project duration:
Level of Complexity Target average active project duration Total maximum active project duration
Simple 4 months 8 months
Small 8 months 12 months
Medium 16 months 24 months
Large 24 months 36 months
Complex 32 months 48 months

A project may be placed on hold for a maximum of 12 months; and
Active duration does not include the 12 month maximum allowed on-hold period.

The total duration of a Standards development project should not exceed five years (48 months + 12 months on hold, which the maximum period of being on hold) from project Kick-Off to its date of completion or cancellation. Where projects are at risk of exceeding their maximum agreed limits, the ultimate consequence may be project cancellation.

International Update


Standards Australia represents our nation on the two major international standardising bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). We coordinate the attendance of Australian experts at international meetings and participate extensively in the preparation of a wide range of International Standards. We are extremely active within the International Standardisation movement and a number of our senior management team members hold important voluntary offices on International Standards bodies.

Visit the International Engagement page on our website to find out more about our activities in this space.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector in our monthly Sector Updates. You will find information on approved standards development projects, draft standards for public comment, and recently published documents on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process is an important part of standards development, providing an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. A summary of draft standards currently open for comment is available here