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In This Edition

 

CEO Report: The Tools of Our Trade – Becoming Simpler, Faster and Better

Snapshot of Publications in August

Stakeholder Engagement Event

Launch of the 2015 Editions of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001

Second Phase of Aged Standards Review: Building and Construction, Communications Sectors

Reminder: Committee Member Deeds

Revised Australian Standard for Lifejackets

Have Your Say About Our Website

2015 Queensland Young Engineer of the Year

 

Another 60 Drafting Leaders Trained Around Australia

Get Involved with a New International Project on Unit Pricing

ISO General Assembly in Seoul

Who Won the #SpeakStandards Video Competition?

Subscribe to our News Room

In Conversation With: Ian Webster

Australian Involvement in International Standardisation

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

CEO Report: The Tools of Our Trade – Becoming Simpler, Faster and Better


 
The technology for developing standards has come a long way.

Back in the 1920s, Standards Australia staff would keep minutes of committee meetings that were bound into books (pictured). All technical details were captured painstakingly by typewriters.

Today, things are very different at Standards Australia. The tools of our “trade” are focussed on making the process simpler, faster, and better.

Within two years of implementing our new enterprise project management system, affectionately known as IRIS, we have seen over 75% of our projects completed in two years or less. This is just the start.

We are working on new methods and tools for collaboration. We are learning from our international counterparts about what they are doing and why and how.

As one example, Standards Australia will be releasing a new committee member standards library. The library will give committee members more access than ever to Standards Australia documents for the purposes of standards development work. This will involve publications being accessed directly by committee members.

We know that while we are doing better in some areas, there are other areas for improvement. We continue to listen to stakeholder feedback and we take action.

The standards development process requires communication, feedback and constructive conversations with all our stakeholders. We welcome your ideas on how we can continue to improve all our processes.

The Board and Executive team held a recent stakeholder engagement event in August to discuss our Strategic Plan for 2016-2020 and get stakeholder feedback. In October, we will take this discussion further with our nominating organisations to make sure that as we continue the transformation of our processes, our stakeholders remain at the core of everything we do.

We must remain dedicated to making it easier to work with us. In essence, we must have processes that are simpler, faster and better.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

Snapshot of Publications in August


AS 1720.5, Timber structures – Part 5: Nailplated timber roof trusses
Scope: Sets out requirements for the design of nailplated timber roof trusses for residential and similar building applications in accordance with AS 1720.1, AS 4055 and the AS(/NZS) 1170 series.

AS 4758:2015, Lifejackets
Part 1: General requirements
Part 2: Materials and components – Requirements and test methods
Part 3: Test methods
Scope: Revision of the 2008 editions. Part 1 specifies the requirements for lifejackets, with new buoyancy classifications added that are suitable for adults and children. Part 2 specifies requirements for the structural materials and components and test methods for the construction of lifejackets. Part 3 specifies test methods for lifejackets.

AS 5637.1, Determination of fire hazard properties
Scope: This new Standard sets out procedures for the assessment of internal wall and ceiling linings according to their tendency to ignite; their tendency to release heat once ignition has occurred; their tendency to cause flashover; their tendency to release smoke; and their contribution to fire growth.

AS 2890.3, Parking facilities – Part 3: Bicycle parking
Scope: Specifies a set of minimum requirements for the layout, design and security of bicycle parking facilities for planners and service providers.

AS/NZS 3845.1, Road safety barrier systems and devices – Part 1: Road safety barrier systems
Scope: Specifies requirements for permanent and temporary safety barriers systems that include longitudinal road safety barriers, terminals, crash cushions, interfaces including transitions, and longitudinal barrier gates.

These are just some of our publications in August. Please read our monthly Sector Updates for more information on approved standards development projects, draft standards for public comment, and recently published documents.

Stakeholder Engagement Event


 
On 26 August, Standards Australia held a stakeholder engagement event in Sydney. About 60 stakeholders, together with the Standards Australia Board, Executive team and senior managers, attended the session, where our CEO Dr Bronwyn Evans presented our 2016-2020 Strategic Plan (PDF available here) and answered questions.

Discussion revolved around the role of Standards Australia in engaging state and territory governments; regional engagement in the Asia-Pacific; increasing consumer participation in standards development; the relationship between standards and innovation; as well as how to improve our standards development and collaborative processes. In all, it was a fruitful discussion on our stakeholder needs. We look forward to discussing these issues and more at our Nominating Organisations Forum in October.

Launch of the 2015 Editions of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001


In September, ISO will be publishing updated editions of two of its most widely-used standards: ISO 14001 for environmental management and ISO 9000 and 9001 for quality management systems.

ISO 14001:2015 is a key business tool for many organisations. With more than 300,000 certificates issued globally every year, it ranks high on the agenda of many organisations worldwide who place importance on their environmental impact. The new edition was published 15 September, which recognises the latest trends, such as an increasing recognition by companies of the need to factor in both external and internal elements that influence their impact, including climate volatility.

The latest edition of ISO 9001, ISO’s flagship quality management systems standard, will be published on 23 September. With over 1.1 million certificates issued worldwide, ISO 9001 helps organisations demonstrate to customers that they can offer products and services of consistently good quality. It also acts as a tool to streamline their processes and make them more efficient at what they do.

The 2015 edition features important changes, which Nigel Croft, Chair of the ISO sub-committee that developed and revised the standard, refers to as an “evolutionary rather than a revolutionary” process. The ISO committee chairs talk about the changes to ISO 9001:2015 on the ISO YouTube channel: "All you need to know about ISO 9001:2015".

You can read more about the new standards at the ISO website: www.iso.org

Standards Australia is collecting submissions of interest for a seminar/webinar on the new ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 standards. If you are interested in attending please email events@standards.org.au with your name, organisation and contact number and we will be in touch when the details are finalised.

Second Phase of Aged Standards Review: Building and Construction, Communications Sectors


Standards Australia is currently in the second stage of the Aged Standards review where we are seeking the views of the general public, nominating organisations and a broad range of stakeholders about all aged standards that do not fall within the area of oversight of any active technical committee.

Australian Standards which have not been revised for more than 10 years, are not referenced in regulation and do not fall within the area of oversight of any active committee are being proposed to be withdrawn after a period of public consultation. There will be a 9 week consultation period on the list of Australian Standards proposed for withdrawal, which is released in batches and by sector.

As announced in our August E-News and email notice, the consultation period for the Building & Construction and Communications sectors started on Thursday 20 August and will end on Thursday 22 October.

To see a list of Australian Standards proposed for withdrawal, visit our Aged Standards page and click on the relevant sector.

If an Australian Standard on the list is still being used in your industry or community and you object to its withdrawal, we want to hear from you. Please reply to the Aged Standards Team (agedstandards@standards.org.au) specifying which standard (number, title and publication year) and justification for your concerns.

Please visit our website for more information.

Reminder: Committee Member Deeds


Standards Australia has updated its Committee Member Deed. There were a number of reasons why the deed was updated, as mentioned in our email notice to Committee Members.

As a member of an active technical committee, sub-committee or working group we would appreciate it if you could please sign the updated Committee Member Deed (with a witness) and return it to us by email, mail or fax by the end of September 2015.

If you have signed the 2014 Committee Member Deed, you do not need to sign the 2015 version, but may if you wish.

Download the 2015 Committee Member Deed (Word Doc).

Completed Committee Member Deeds may be returned via:
Email: committee.records@standards.org.au
Mail: Standards Australia, GPO Box 476, Sydney NSW 2001
Fax: (+61 2) 9237 6010

A list of frequently asked questions (PDF) is available from our website.

If you have any other queries regarding the Committee Member Deed please feel welcome to contact us at the above email address.

Revised Australian Standard for Lifejackets


 
Last month, Standards Australia published a revised edition of the AS 4758 series on lifejackets. The revised Standards were developed by Technical Committee CS-060, Lifejackets and Personal Safety Equipment for Small Craft. The requirements in the Australian Standard are now more consistent with international standards, and provides manufacturers with the scope for greater innovation in design and manufacturing.

Given the great number of Australians involved in water activities at work or play, the standard now caters to a wider audience. New buoyancy categories have been added for young children as well as more competent swimmers involved in specialist activities. Additionally, the testing methods for materials, components and general requirements of lifejackets have been updated.

To learn more about the revisions to AS 4758, see our media release.

Have Your Say About Our Website


We want to hear your views on how we can improve our website (www.standards.org.au). Take a short 2-minute survey.

2015 Queensland Young Engineer of the Year


 
Beer Opatsuwan (R) accepting his award, with Chris Warnock of Engineers Australia.
We are delighted to announce that one of our 2014-2015 Young Leaders, Beer Opatsuwan, has been awarded the prestigious 2015 Queensland Young Professional Engineer of the Year. This award is part of the Queensland Engineering Excellence Awards Program, hosted each year by the Queensland Division of Engineers Australia. These awards recognise engineers that have demonstrated leadership and innovation in their fields.

Beer works for Energex as their Network Substation Standards Engineer, and has been with the organisation since 2008. In his current role, he manages standards, policies and development of electricity assets.

His interest in standards goes beyond his regular job. Not only did he participate in last year’s Standards Australia Young Leaders Program, but he is also a representative for Australia as an IEC Young Professional.

In addition, Beer is an active member on Energex’s standby emergency response team, which assists the community of Southeast Queensland during extreme weather.

We are proud of Beer’s Young Leader success story, and wish him the best of luck with his future as a leader in the engineering world as well as in standards development. Congratulations, Beer!

Another 60 Drafting Leaders Trained Around Australia


 
Workshop participants in Perth with our Training Manager Kate Fraser (third from right).
Earlier this year, Standards Australia delivered Drafting Leaders Workshops for committee members in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra and Perth.

This interactive workshop aims to train Committee Members on the writing styles and structure of Australian Standards. Almost everyone who attended said that they better understood the Drafting Rules by the end of the workshop.

Here is what participants have said about the workshop:

“I now have a much better understanding of what content and how the content of a standard should be written and laid out.”

“General interaction by the group was excellent. Well-paced content. Good examples used. Specific examples used and promises of follow-up appreciated.”

“This is my first effort at drafting. It is a perfect time to develop this knowledge.”

“Gaining a holistic view of the drafting process and meeting members and leaders of other committees.”

“Hearing other people’s views from other standards. The content has given me a better understanding of standards and how they are written.”

“Opportunities to apply what was being taught. Also good to mix with other people with different skill sets.”

If you missed out this time and wish to attend, another round of workshops will be planned for committee members in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane in November 2015. Click here to read more and for instructions on how to submit your interest.

Get Involved with a New International Project on Unit Pricing


Australia is leading the development of a new international standard on unit pricing, which will provide guidance on the way price and quantity are expressed to consumers. ISO Project Committee 294, Guidance on unit pricing, will be developing this standard, with support from ISO’s Consumer Policy Committee (COPOLCO). Standards Australia is the Secretariat for ISO/PC 294.

The proposed standard aims to provide a set of principles on how to design, develop, implement, and maintain unit pricing on goods. With unit pricing, consumers will be able to shop more efficiently and cost-effectively. This could be particularly beneficial to countries with no unit price legislation already in place.

We welcome any national standards bodies or interested ISO liaison organisations to get involved. Contact Andrew McKay, Secretary of ISO/PC 294, to express your interest: andrew.mckay@standards.org.au. If you’d like to know more about this project and its scope, click here.

ISO General Assembly in Seoul


 
ISO is holding its General Assembly from 13–18 September in Seoul. Standards Australia will join over 600 delegates from 163 countries at the ISO General Assembly. Issues and subjects to be discussed include:
  • ISO Strategy 2016-2020;
  • Standards and education;
  • Revisions of ISO 9001 and ISO 14001; and
  • ISO’s Action Plan for Developing Countries.
Look out for our report in upcoming issues and in social media. More event information can be found here.

Who Won the #SpeakStandards Video Competition?


 
Over 130 entries from all over the world were submitted for the World Standards Day #SpeakStandards Video Competition.

A team from Mexico put together the winning video. Their video highlighting the importance of standardised graphical symbols in our daily life obtained half of the nearly 6,500 public votes.

Find out more about the winners and watch their videos here.

Subscribe to our News Room


  E-News is published monthly, but if you would like to receive news releases, statements and updates from Standards Australia as soon as they become available, subscribe to our News Room, and get them hot off the press!

In Conversation With: Ian Webster


 
The standards development process would not be possible without our dedicated committee members. In this new series, we sit down each month with various committee members to learn what it is like to be in their shoes.

To kick off the series, we interviewed Ian Webster, who is the Group Engineering Manager for Ampcontrol. He is currently Chair of EL-023, Electrical Equipment for Mines and Quarries; CS-034, Safety of Swimming Pools and Spa Baths; and EL-014-09, Gas Detection. He is a Committee Member of EL-014, Hazardous Areas, and EL-023-07-01, Maintenance of Gas Detectors in Coal Mines.

Standards Australia: In what capacity do you interact with Standards Australia?
Ian Webster: At the encouragement of Peter Cockbain (Standards Australia Board member with 42 years of personal involvement in standards development), I joined my first technical committee meeting to revise AS/NZS:2081, Electrical protection devices for mines and quarries, in 2007. My initial reaction was one of utter intimidation as the new kid on the block amongst seasoned veterans and accomplished practitioners. Since then I have come to better understand the machinations of standards development and so find greater opportunity to contribute.

SA: What is a day in your world like for you?
Are all of my days the same? Certainly not, and this is the attraction of my current role. Ampcontrol has grown from a group of engineering and manufacturing companies, all of which started out with different systems and tools. When I came on board, one of my roles was to facilitate the integration and collaboration of these teams. For me, it’s not so much about doing the engineering, but getting the engineering done. This also applies to my roles as chair of technical committees: making sure the standards are developed and maintained as a committee, without over-burdening myself as an individual contributor.

SA: What do you think is in the future of standardisation?
IW: We need to move forward in the use of technology in two ways. The first is to embrace electronic collaboration for standards development on an interactive platform, much like a Wiki. All of the work should be done online, allowing for multiple-user editing, with a ‘single source of truth’, rather than propagating different versions of Word documents. This provides the opportunity for the collaboration platform and electronic publication to converge. You could then potentially publish informative documents such as handbooks in a peer-reviewed online format that would be cheaper and simpler to revise and maintain, and which would arguably be more user-friendly.

The second thing is remote conferencing. A lot of collaborators, especially in the mining equipment field, work in remote areas, and travelling to committee meetings is a real challenge. Having the opportunity to better engage in meetings from remote locations would increase participation. In many sectors, end-users often find it difficult to justify the time away from work, and therefore aren’t represented. I’m convinced that we need to make it easier to participate to have greater involvement and participation from the younger generation.

I do appreciate the rigour and discipline needed to oversee standards development, and that change is predicated by many and complex factors, but without a vision of what can be achieved we will remain with the status quo.
 
     
 
 

Australian Involvement in International Standardisation


Standards Australia has recently released an updated guide SG-015: Australian Involvement in International Standardisation. Updates have been made to ensure the guide is up-to-date and current with ISO and IEC requirements and also to better reflect Standards Australia’s current operations.

The main changes to SG-015 are as follows:
  • Clause 4.2 was updated to reference Systems Committees which now operate within IEC.
  • Clause 6.2 was updated to reflect recent changes made to the ISO/IEC Directives regarding downgrading of membership for members who fail to vote on drafts.
  • Annex A was updated to include information about attendance by delegates via online videoconference/ teleconference (Clause A.2.7).
  • Annex C was updated to remove the table showing timeframes on international deliverables as it was out of date.
  • References to a new ‘Guide for nomination and funding application process to attend international meetings’ have also been included which allowed the deletion of Annex B as it was a duplication.
The new ‘Guide for nomination and funding application process to attend international meetings’ replaces SDO Procedure 3 (and Annex B of SG-015). This guide provides information to National Mirror Committees on the application process for a delegate to attend an ISO or IEC meeting and guidelines on the provision of subsidies under the Support for Industry Service Organisations (SISO) Scheme. Updated information about the application of GST to these subsidies has also been included.

The ‘International Delegates Meeting Report template’ provided by Standards Australia for delegates to use when preparing their reports on international standardisation meetings attended has also been updated for easier use.

The following documents are located on the Coordination and Information page on our website:

International Update


Standards Australia represents our nation on the two major international standardising bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). We coordinate the attendance of Australian experts at international meetings and participate extensively in the preparation of a wide range of international standards. We are extremely active within the international standardisation movement and a number of our senior management team members hold important voluntary offices on international standards bodies.

Read here to find out more about our activities in this space.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector in our monthly Sector Updates. You will find information on approved standards development projects, draft standards for public comment, and recently published documents on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process is an important part of standards development, providing an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. A summary of draft standards currently open for comment is available here.