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April 2016 Edition

 

CEO Report: Holding Health to the Highest Standard

In Conversation with our 2015-2016 Young Leaders

Continued Cooperation with New Zealand

Australia Proposes International Blockchain Standards

Controlling Contamination in Forensic Analysis

Save the Date: Motorcycle Helmets Forum

Proposed Adoption of Updated ISO 14001

Submissions Open: Communications Cabling Standards

NSW Office of State Revenue CIO Headlines Digital Governance Forum

 

DesignBUILD 2016

Seeking Interest in ISO/TC 279 Innovation Management

Building Engagement with Developing Countries

Project Prioritisation: Round 12 Wrap Up

Standards Development Project Review Surveys

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

Celebrating AFS at the International Day of Forests

CEO Report: Holding Health to the Highest Standard


 
Healthcare is a basic need worldwide. It is in all of our best interests to have access to high quality, cost-effective products and services.

The United Nations recognised this by including good health and well-being as one of the UN Sustainable Development Goals to achieve by 2030.

Healthcare is also a significant part of the global economy. In 2013, developed countries spent approximately 9% of their GDP on healthcare alone (oecd.org).

The health sector within the Australian economy is of the same order with total expenditure for 2013 at 9.8% (aihw.gov.au).

World Health Day on 7 April is a day where we can acknowledge the significance of this sector and draw attention to global health issues. The theme for this year was “Beat Diabetes”.

World Health Day was an opportunity to raise awareness on the role standards play in supporting the health sector, from the patient down to the provider. They help ensure a high quality of care, trustworthy products and services, and harmonisation within the sector to increase efficiency and reduce costs.

Health standards keep the sector up to date with changing technologies. For example, at the international level we recently saw the release of the revision of ISO 13485. An important standard for Australia’s medical devices sector because it sets out requirements for quality management systems specifically relating to medical devices.

Standards can also support longer established healthcare practices that are not necessarily included in global regulation. An example of this is the international work program currently being developed for standards in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

For World Health Day we partnered with ISO to showcase three of Australia’s own health experts. They shared why standards matter in the areas of Vendor Credentialing, Traditional Chinese Medicine and Digital Hospitals.

I am delighted to see that Australia is acting as a global leader in these three healthcare areas with Australia either developing world-first documents or being heavily involved at the international level of development. I look forward to the developments to come.

With contributions from our members in the health industry, we can continue to make Australia a healthier and safer place.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

In Conversation with our 2015-2016 Young Leaders


 
From left: Osama Ali, Katherine Moloney, Aidan Roberts, Ajay Anand, Tyler Mason, Grant Wood, Bryce Wood, Shingai Mabambe. Absent: Irini Vazanellis, Alexandra Price
Congratulations to our 2015-2016 Young Leaders on their recent graduation from the program on Wednesday 13 April. Their final session consisted of training on influence and persuasion, the conclusion of their mentoring partnerships and a farewell dinner in Sydney with guest speaker Dr Raji Ambikairajah. We thought it would be appropriate to feature them in our ‘In Conversation with’ series this month to learn more about their experiences in standards development.

Standards Australia: What was your biggest takeaway from the program?
Shingai Mabambe: I have come to appreciate the huge amount of work that goes into project proposals, prioritisation, stakeholder engagement, drafting standards, reviewing and reaching consensus. A phenomenal number of talented, experienced and skilled professionals join together to ensure standards remain relevant and provide net benefit to Australians.
Katherine Moloney: The various trainings provided a great mix of theory and practice in drafting standards, helped me move away from academic writing to a style more suitable for business, and improved my influence and persuasion skills. I am also thrilled to have had the opportunity to contribute to the development of a standard.

SA: Tell us about a lesson learned from your mentor.
Tyler Mason: In any presentation or proposal to a committee, consider the benefits and effects upon each represented party. How they initially perceive the information will colour their interpretation.
Osama Ali: Know your topic, participate, and be part of the solution rather than the problem.

SA: What do you think is in the future of standardisation?
Grant Wood: I would like to see parts of deemed-to-satisfy standards made available as a phone app for tradesmen to use on-site. The user would be given the solution to questions generated by the app, rather than the user having to trawl through numerous pages of a document.
Aidan Roberts: Streamlining processes to keep up with the rate of changing technology, a continued push towards performance based standards, and greater adoption of global standards.
Ajay Anand: Standardisation will be required to address various emerging challenges like climate change and sustainable energy adoption. Australia’s involvement with international standards development is essential for early learnings on technological solutions.

SA: How can Standards Australia improve our development process?
Alexandra Price: End users of standards are in many ways untapped stakeholders. Ongoing feedback within the first few years of publication would be valuable as it would help identify potential improvements in wording/clarifying statements to be incorporated into future standards or to prompt an amendment.
Bryce Wood: Standards Australia may want to consider introducing a video conferencing option or a webinar type option as it can be hard to get large groups to all physically meet at the same time.

Interested in the 2016-2017 Young Leaders Program? Email your interest to Young.Leaders@standards.org.au for more information on what the program entails and how to apply.

Continued Cooperation with New Zealand


 
Under the Standards and Accreditation Act 2015, the responsibility for standards development was transferred from Standards New Zealand to the New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE).

We are pleased to announce that the long standing arrangements for cooperation will remain in place. The leadership and operational teams of Standards Australia and the MBIE have worked solidly to ensure a smooth transition. This work will continue to ensure that the operational processes which are in place are strengthened and improved.

Australian stakeholders with any questions can contact a Standards Australia National Sector Manager or your committee’s Project Manager.

Australia Proposes International Blockchain Standards


Blockchain and electronic distributed ledger technologies are an emerging peer-to-peer database tool for managing and recording transactions.

Standards Australia has recently submitted a proposal for new international standards on blockchain technology and electronic distributed ledger technologies to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) for consideration by its 161 member bodies.

This follows consultations with stakeholders which uncovered that interoperability between different protocols is the key to unlocking the potential of blockchain.

The proposal supports interoperability and data interchange among users, applications and systems globally.

“This initiative represents a genuine opportunity for Australia to make its mark as a global hub for innovation,” said Mr Adrian O’Connell, Acting Chief Executive Officer, Standards Australia.

For more information, see our media release (PDF).

Controlling Contamination in Forensic Analysis


 
Imagine this: you’re a forensic scientist involved in a controversial criminal case. The outcome literally lies in your hands as you gaze into the DNA evidence direct from the crime scene. But how can you be sure the DNA isn’t contaminated? What if an outside factor has tainted your sample?

There is a standard that exists precisely for this reason. It is designed to minimise DNA contamination and therefore produce DNA evidence of higher quality and interpretive value, according to Clinton Cummins from Victoria Police.

The standard changes the way manufacturers make products used in the collection, storage and analysis of forensic evidence. The impact of this standard has been recognised globally and was recently adopted into international practice.

For more information, see the media release (PDF).

Save the Date: Motorcycle Helmets Forum


 
Standards Australia will host a second forum on the motorcycle helmets standard AS/NZS 1698:1988, Protective helmets for vehicle users. This event will build upon discussions held last year.

Since last year’s forum, certain circumstances have changed:
  • The ACCC has revoked Consumer Protection Notice No. 9 of 1990 - Consumer Product Safety Standard: Protective Helmets for Motor Cyclists, which made a mandatory reference to AS 1698-1988; and
  • A number of state and territory jurisdictions now allow helmets that comply with UN/ECE 22-05.
The forum will occur on Wednesday 18 May 2016. Find all the details in the event invitation (PDF).

Proposed Adoption of Updated ISO 14001


Standards Australia has received a proposal for committee QR-011, Environmental Management Systems, to directly adopt the September 2015 update of ISO 14001, Environmental management systems – Requirements with guidance for use. It will be out for public comment beginning 29 April 2016.

For more information on the 2015 update, please see ISO’s website. Contact Jessica Curtis, National Sector Manager, Standards Australia, with any questions at jessica.curtis@standards.org.au.

Submissions Open: Communications Cabling Standards


On 7 April Standards Australia hosted a round table regarding communications cabling standards. The purpose of the round table was to discuss the direct text adoption of ISO/IEC 14543.3 (Parts 1–6), Communication layers – Network based control.

To ensure that all relevant stakeholders have an opportunity to formally communicate their views, Standards Australia will accept written submissions regarding communications cabling. Learn more on our website (PDF).

NSW Office of State Revenue CIO Headlines Digital Governance Forum


Ms Angela Donohoe, Chief Information Officer, NSW Office of State Revenue spoke about IT benefits realisation at Standards Australia’s Digital Governance Forum on Tuesday 5 April 2016.

In her interview with Ms Jan Begg, Chair of Standards Australia’s IT-030 IT Governance committee, Ms Donohoe referenced examples from her experiences as CIO and business executive in the public and private sectors.

The forum also heard from a panel of experts including: Editor of SA/SNZ TS 8019, Mr Sandeep Mathur; ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 40/WG 2 Convenor, Ms Erin Casteel; and ISO/IEC SC 40/WG 3 Member, Ms Melanie Cheong. The panellists shared their views on international standards development initiatives related to IT governance and benefits realisation.

The event served to mark the recent publication by IT-030 of SA/SNZ TS 8019:2016, Governance of Benefits Realization for IT Enabled Investments.

DesignBUILD 2016


 
In the first week of May, Standards Australia will be participating in the 30th DesignBUILD event at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre. For three days of networking and inspiration, DesignBUILD brings together Australia’s architects, building professionals, contractors and designer community together with manufacturers, suppliers and service providers who work across the residential and commercial industry sectors.

Tim Wheeler, National Sector Manager for building and construction, will be providing insight on the use of standards as deemed-to-satisfy solutions to meet the National Construction Code performance requirements. He will also attend the Lunch & Learn session as one of the panellists for a discussion on non-conforming and non-complying products in the building industry.

Standards Australia will have a stand at the show so if you are attending, come say hello!

Seeking Interest in ISO/TC 279 Innovation Management


The ISO technical committee for innovation management ISO/TC 279 was established in 2013 and currently boasts 35 participating member national standards bodies.

The committee is responsible for the standardisation of terminology tools and methods and interactions between relevant parties to enable innovation. There are currently four working groups within ISO/TC 279 focussing on:

Innovation management;
Terminology, terms and definitions;
Tools and methods; and
Innovation management assessment

While Australia is currently not a member of ISO/TC 279, we kindly seek your views in relation to whether Australia should participate on ISO/TC 279 to support the Commonwealth’s National Innovation and Science Agenda.

If you are interested in contributing to Australian participation on ISO/TC 279 or simply want to learn more, please contact Varant Meguerditchian, Senior Manager, Stakeholder Engagement & Public Affairs at varant.meguerditchian@standards.org.au or 02 9237 6119.

Building Engagement with Developing Countries


ISO DEVCO leads international work for developing countries. DEVCO supports these countries in their standards development through technical assistance and training.

Standards Australia has been assisting ISO DEVCO through its participation on the ISO DEVCO Chairs Advisory Group and contributed to the development of ISO’s Action Plan for developing countries 2016-2020. The APDC is available from the ISO website.

Project Prioritisation: Round 12 Wrap Up


Standards Australia’s twelfth round of Project Prioritisation closed on Wednesday 23 March 2016. We received 70 project proposals for new or revised standards, which can be viewed on our Project Prioritisation Updates page.

These projects are currently undergoing their initial review by our National Sector Managers. All projects will then be considered by the Standards Development and Accreditation Committee (SDAC) at its upcoming meeting in May.

For more information, see proposing a project, and the prioritisation and selection process.

Standards Development Project Review Surveys


To better understand the needs of our contributors and allow an opportunity for committee members to comment on the standards development process, a selection of committees will be surveyed.

The survey will consist of four questions. It will only take a few minutes to complete and participants may remain anonymous if preferred.

We plan to start inviting committees to complete the survey in April/May. Please contact your Project Manager with any questions.
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents our nation on the two major international standardising bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

The Australian and New Zealand Wiring Rules (AS/NZS 3000) are currently out for public comment and available on the above link.
 
 
 
 

Celebrating AFS at the International Day of Forests


 
Michael Hartman, CEO, Skills Impact (left), Rhonda Moore, Senior Field Officer, TABMA Australia, and Varant Meguerditchian, Senior Manager, Stakeholder Engagement and Public Affairs, Standards Australia.
“The future of the forestry industry will be found in the change of narrative about what the sector does and doesn’t do,” Senator Anne Ruston said at an International Day of Forests celebration dinner in Melbourne on 21 March.

The dinner, organised by Australian Forestry Standard Ltd at the heritage-listed, timber-encased Cargo Hall at South Wharf, welcomed Ben Gunneberg, CEO of PEFC International, the world’s largest forest certification system with more than 270 million hectares of certified forests.

Senator Ruston, the Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, who has responsibility for forests, said the industry was transitioning from an old way of doing business to a new way. 

“Forestry is clean, green and an alternative energy source. It’s also a closed-loop industry these days. And that’s where I think certification has an incredibly important role to play – your credibility is going to be based on your ability to demonstrate to the world that you are what you say you are.

“I think our opportunity in forestry is about our ability to exploit our resource to the point of sustainability. And the only way that we are going to be able to get to a point of sustainability is if we have credibility in the public domain.”

She said there were vested interests taking a very clear commercial advantage by slamming their competitors in the Australian marketplace and distributing misleading and incredibly mischievous information.

“Unless you take control of the credibility of your industry, which you have, I think we are about to get hijacked by vested interests who purport to be serving the best interests of these particular renewable resources around the world, when they are not,” Senator Ruston said. “The two most important issues that we face as a forest industry going into the future are our ability to set the settings right so that we can encourage the establishment of new plantations – and obviously the social licence which I think is the fundamental point of your certification.”

Senator Ruston added, “Coming from the government, there’s never been a more exciting time to be in the forestry industry in Australia. Pat yourselves on the back, I really believe you have an amazing industry.”