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June 2016 Edition

 

CEO Report: Turning on the Digital Switch

Winners of the 2016 Standards Awards

In Conversation with Mike Harding

Why Standards Matter to Consumers

Fine Bubble Technology Symposium

Upcoming Guard Dogs Forum

New Standard on Heat Packs

Enter our WSD Video Competition for a chance to win $500!

 

Apply Now! 2016-2017 Young Leaders Program

Committee Training Roll-out Continues

Outcomes from Motorcycle Helmets Forum

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

Standards Australia Hosts SDO Round Table

CEO Report: Turning on the Digital Switch


 
Earlier this month, we held our mid-year Council meeting of member organisations at the MCG in Melbourne. It was an important meeting as we were able to brief our Council on our digital transformation program*.

The program has at its core the foundations for building the digital standards body needed for the future.

This isn’t a piece of work we started thinking about last week or last month; we have been planning, and consulting and learning over the last couple of years. We have engaged widely, with members, international counterparts, industry bodies, governments, and importantly, our technical committee members. All have been very generous with their time, insights and ideas about how we can transition to a truly digital world.

Our brief has always been to see how we could move from a paper based world in a best of class way.

We are now rolling out the first stage of our program which will see us:

Establish a central and searchable content repository;
Streamlining multiple workflows making it simpler, faster and better to work with us; and
Connecting content development to digital curation with the flexibility of multiple outputs.

As with any fundamental shift, there is no switch that we will turn on and take us from today to tomorrow. With any change process, we are conscious that we need to take our staff and stakeholders on the journey of change and have strong plans in place in both areas.

As we start implementation of our digital strategy, we look forward to the discussion continuing with all of you, our stakeholders, on how we together can add more value to the lives and the economic prosperity of all Australians.

This journey and conversation is only just beginning.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

* Learn more about the digital transformation program in our media release (PDF).

Winners of the 2016 Standards Awards


We are pleased to announce this year's winners of the 2016 Standards Awards:

W.R. Hebblewhite Medal
Mike Harding

Meritorious Contribution Award – International
Dusanka Sabic

Meritorious Contribution Award – National
Anthea Hammon

Young Leader Award
Steven Humphries

Outstanding Committee Award
EL-041, Lamps and Related Equipment
Owen Manley – Chairperson

Pictured: Chairman Richard Brooks, Steven Humphries, Mike Harding, Anthea Hammon, Dusanka Sabic, Owen Manley and Chief Executive Officer Dr Bronwyn Evans
To all our Standards Awards winners, thank you for your distinguished service and outstanding contribution to the net benefit of Australia and the international community.

For more information, see the 2016 Standards Awards Winners page on our website.

In Conversation with Mike Harding


 
It is only fitting that this month we feature Mike Harding, the winner of the 2016 W.R. Hebblewhite Award. Mike is the current National Manager of Building Codes and Standards with the Housing Industry Association (HIA). He has held this position for the last thirteen years of his over fifty years in the building and construction industry. Mike’s career began as a carpenter and then builder. He switched to working directly with industry associations and eventually took on the role of National Technical Director at Master Builders Australia before accepting his present role in 2002. Mike currently sits on six standards committees but has represented the HIA on all of its standards committees over the past 13 years.

Standards Australia: In what capacity do you interact with Standards Australia?
Mike Harding: I have managed HIA’s input into over 70 standards committees. This responsibility is now shared across HIA’s building services team, so I am no longer the sole HIA representative. With this shift I now act as a mentor to our building services team as they enter the world of standards committees for the first time.

SA: Tell us a highlight from your time as a committee member.
MH: Without a doubt, the highlight was working with TM-002. This committee was responsible for writing and amending AS 1684, Residential timber framed construction, or “the Timber Framing Code” as we like to call it.

The Committee had a fabulous project manager in Chi-Nam Si. Membership comprised mostly of the timber industry along with a couple of us from the building industry. TM-002 was a model of how a committee should function and what can and should be achieved. We had a united focus, everyone had a great work ethic and above all everything had to be practical and functional.

I can honestly say that my involvement with members of that committee has gone well and truly beyond us being work colleagues to the point where people like Col McKenzie from Timber Queensland and Norm Bowen of the ABCB are now lifelong friends.

SA: What advice would you give to new committee members?
MH: Everyone who comes to the table at a standards meeting has a particular set of interests that they want to develop or manage. When representing those interests, the worst thing that can happen is alienating yourself from the reality of what is trying to be achieved. You should always ask yourself: are you going to be part of the solution or are you a part of the problem? The advice I would give is be involved, be constructive and be positive towards the goals of the committee.

SA: Is there a specific standard that stands out a major accomplishment?
MH: Apart from the work on the Timber Framing Code another big achievement was producing AS 4055, Wind loads for houses. When I was a young bloke nearly all of us knew how to use AS/NZS 1170.2, Structural design actions – Wind actions, which deals with wind loading. But as time went on, the standard became more complex and too conservative for house building. It was a huge breakthrough to get this standard into the industry given that wind loads are a major consideration in the structural aspects of house building. The standard is now widely accepted. It is a simplified, easy-to-use version of AS/NZS 1170.2. Today a lot of other standards rely on the information and scope of AS 4055.

SA: How has the role of Standards Australia changed throughout the years?
MH: Forty years ago there was a clear “us and them” approach when it came to standardisation. Governments considered standards to be troublesome and industry considered them to be intrusive and unwelcome. Today there isn’t that kind of attitude. With the world marketplace shrinking every day, the use of standards, locally or on the international scene, has to play an ever-increasing role. For the building sector it is a means of achieving society goals in a unified and consistent manner. This approach can only expand as new materials, systems and technologies are presented.

SA: How can Standards Australia better collaborate with stakeholders?
MH: You are better at it now than at any time in the past. Through stakeholder meetings and open discussions, you are seeking our opinions and listening to us. I also think that committee members are valued more than ever before. Stakeholders are the lifeblood of SA, and we need to be seen this way for SA to flourish and prosper. Many of the issues are the same for stakeholders across all industries, so in order to grow you must address these shared concerns. Lastly, project prioritisation now has a more realistic and workable set of principles.

Why Standards Matter to Consumers


 
Standards Australia is proud to play a key role bringing national consumer interests to global standards development.

Watch our video which explains the role of standards for consumers and looks at the example of unit pricing.

Fine Bubble Technology Symposium


Trials in applications of fine bubble technology have been expanding globally. This technology has the potential to impact a wide range of industries.

At our symposium on Monday 25 July 2016, Japanese and international authorities will report on current studies and the latest trends in research and development of fine bubbles. We will also discuss participation in the ISO Technical Committee 281, Fine Bubble Technology.

See the event invitation (PDF) to learn more and register.

Upcoming Guard Dogs Forum


 
Standards Australia will be hosting a forum on 22 June 2016 to address issues relevant to the working dog industry. Discussion topics will include the current role of working dogs, animal welfare conditions, societal expectations and the potential need for standards.

To register for this event, view the invitation (PDF).

New Standard on Heat Packs


Just in time for winter, a new Australian Standard was recently published to address the design, construction, performance and labelling of microwaveable heat packs.

Read our media release (PDF) for more information.

Enter our WSD Video Competition for a chance to win $500!


 
October 14 is a special day in standards development—it’s World Standards Day! To celebrate, Standards Australia is hosting a video competition.

The winning video will receive $500. Runners-up will receive $150.

To learn more, watch our video and find out how to enter (PDF).

Apply Now! 2016-2017 Young Leaders Program


It’s not too late to send us your applications to be a part of the upcoming Young Leaders Program! We are accepting applications until 30 June 2016.

To learn how to apply, download the Young Leaders Program 2016-2017 (PDF).

Committee Training Roll-out Continues


 
In May and June 2016, Standards Australia delivered workshops to 70 committee members on ‘How to Write an Australian Standard’ in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Adelaide, Canberra and Perth.

This new and improved, interactive workshop walked through the writing styles and structure of Australian Standards, amendments and international adoptions. The majority of attendees said that they considered it essential training for all committee members.

If you missed out, another round is planned for Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane in late 2016. Details of the workshop can be found on the Training page on our website. Email sd.trainer@standards.org.au with your expression of interest.

Outcomes from Motorcycle Helmets Forum


Standards Australia held an open forum on Wednesday 18 May 2016 regarding motorcycle helmet standards and regulation in Australia. Agreement was reached to:

As a first step, revise the Australian Standard to support innovation and clarify areas of misinterpretation within the document;
As a second step, transition away from the Australian Standard which would be withdrawn or deemed obsolescent;
Develop a grandfathering plan for the Australian Standard; and
Explore further Australian participation in the UNECE Regulatory/Standards committee.
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.
 
 
 
 

Standards Australia Hosts SDO Round Table


On Tuesday 31 May 2016 Standards Australia hosted a round table for standards development organisations (SDOs). It was an opportunity to discuss operational best practices and develop greater understanding of audit and accreditation requirements for SDOs.

In his opening remarks, Chair of the Standards Australia Board, Mr Richard Brooks described attendee participation as a critical component of Standards Australia’s commitment to support SDOs. Mr Brooks also discussed the evolving nature of the standards and conformance infrastructure in Australia, detailing Standards Australia’s ambitious digital transformation plan and the benefits that changes in technology can bring to stakeholders and SDOs.

The round table was attended by representatives from four accredited SDOs, members of the Standards Australia Board, and others interested in accreditation.

The main topics of discussion were:

SDO accreditation application processes;
Understanding, planning and preparing for SDO auditing; and
Public outreach and SDO promotion through Standards Australia’s public affairs and news outlets.

Australian Forestry Standard Limited CEO, Mr Simon Dorries delivered a special presentation on the issues, challenges and opportunities faced by AFSL.

The next SDO Round Table will be held in late 2016 and will focus on standards development processes. For further information regarding the next SDO Round Table or SDO accreditation, contact Varant Meguerditchian, Senior Manager, Stakeholder Engagement & Public Affairs at varant.meguerditchian@standards.org.au