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August 2016 Edition

 

CEO Report: The Importance of a Common Purpose

In Conversation with John Snare

Start of Project Prioritisation Round 13

Publication of Advanced Metering Roadmap Report

Welcoming our 2016-2017 Young Leaders

Communicating the Impact of Aircraft Noise

7th International Fine Bubble Technology Symposium

Calling Experts in Systems and Software Engineering

 

Transfer of ANZEx Scheme

Standards Australia Revising Standardisation Guide 009

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

SCS Global Services AS 4707 Accreditation Gives Certificate Holders Access to AFS Brand

Due Diligence: CoC Documentation Process

CEO Report: The Importance of a Common Purpose


 
This month, over 100 of our key nominating organisations joined us for the 2016 Nominating Organisation Forums in Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra.

The agenda was broad and allowed the discussion to move from the simple things that we could do differently today, to over-the-horizon strategic discussions about how Australian Standards will remain relevant in the digital, connected new world.

There were many themes that emerged during the sessions, but one theme was consistent, and that was “collaboration”.

Our processes have been built on collaboration since our inception in 1922. Since then, the world has changed and the work that we do has also changed. But at every step, collaboration has been central to our work and the value that we add.

To collaborate, there must be a common purpose, there must be trust, and there must be a level of mutual respect where feedback can be given and received in a constructive and helpful way. Without exception, this was the spirit of the discussions during the Nominating Organisation Forums. We are very fortunate to have such strong relationships with our contributors.

The discussions highlighted some big issues that need to be managed. These included:
• time available in a range of sectors is under pressure,
• the existing operating and business models of our stakeholders are under pressure,
• sectoral issues are converging and what would once have been the work of one ‘committee’ is now the focus of multiple communities that work beyond national borders.

These issues are often complex but I have no doubt that the common purpose, trust, and mutual respect that sits within our standards community puts us in a great position to be able to work through these issues together.

Building a common purpose is a theme that we will be taking to the General Assembly of the ISO members in China in just a few weeks, and I look forward to reporting back to you on the outcomes of this meetings in a future newsletter.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

In Conversation with John Snare


 
John Snare has more than twenty five years’ experience in information security risk management as a consultant and telecommunications engineer. John has worked for organisations such as Fujitsu Consulting, ANZ bank, Telstra and Adacel Technologies. His involvement in standards began in the 1980s, including the development of the first Australian Standards for EFTPOS. For the past thirty years John has chaired the committee responsible for information security and served as the Head of the Australian delegation to the international committee on IT Security Techniques. These committees oversee a broad spectrum, from cryptographic techniques to identity management.

Standards Australia: In what capacity do you interact with Standards Australia?
John Snare: My involvement with Standards Australia has focused on developing and maintaining standards that facilitate distributed applications and services; in particular standards concerning information and IT security.

SA: How do standards support your sector?
JS: Standards are critical for distributed systems. All users as well as system providers need a common understanding of how to send and receive information, how to interpret what is received, and the degree to which confidentiality, integrity and availability are assured. Users also need to understand the effect of any information processing within these systems.

Information security standards are relevant to all government and industry sectors. They are key to the success of e-products and e-services. Not only does this help prevent fraud, but it is also a basis for building trust with users, whether they are individuals or organisations.

A commonly overlooked advantage of developing and using all standards is that by pooling resources to develop solutions, everyone wins in terms of cost, time and quality. Each individual brings their expertise to an efficient, collective outcome. With good standards in place, business and government can innovate and compete in a world market.

SA: What has been one of the biggest rewards as a committee member?
JS: For me, working on Standards Australia committees has provided a unique opportunity to both share professional expertise and develop new professional knowledge and skills. There are not many places where people can openly and honestly exchange ideas. The standards development process demands that people share real, in-depth knowledge and experience. Being part of this has been both a privilege and source of great satisfaction.

SA: How can Standards Australia better collaborate with stakeholders?
JS: Organisations can save money by using standards rather than developing their own solutions. Standards Australia should continue to work with businesses and government to improve this awareness. Potential standards users should be encouraged to find quicker, cheaper solutions that leverage the work and expertise of others, as encapsulated in Australian and international standards.

Start of Project Prioritisation Round 13


Standards Australia welcomes proposals to amend, revise or develop new Australian Standards. The 13th round of project prioritisation opened on Monday 8 August 2016 and will close on Wednesday 21 September 2016.

Read more about the process on our website or speak to one of our National Sector Managers.

Publication of Advanced Metering Roadmap Report


 
The Report (PDF) on the Roadmap for Advanced Metering Standards is now available. This Roadmap will serve as the foundation for future Australian Standards in advanced metering.

This report provides background on advanced metering standards and explains the process of developing the Roadmap together with Vector, Landis+Gyr, EDMI, ENA and Origin.

Welcoming our 2016-2017 Young Leaders


 
Early this month Standards Australia kicked off the 2016-2017 Young Leaders Program. If you're on a committee, keep an eye out for a Young Leader in one of your meetings.

To learn more about this program, visit our website. Questions about the program can be emailed to Young.Leaders@standards.org.au

Communicating the Impact of Aircraft Noise


 
Standards Australia recently published Handbook SA HB 149:2016, Acoustics—Guidance on producing information on aircraft noise. This document specifies how to present the impact of aircraft noise in a format that is meaningful to the public.

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

7th International Fine Bubble Technology Symposium


 
Sponsored by the Australian Government’s Australia Japan Foundation, Standards Australia was proud to host the 7th International Fine Bubble Technology Symposium on 25 July 2016.

Fine bubble technology is an exciting, innovative technology with potential applications in an impressive range of industries. These include cleaning, medical, pharmaceutical, healthcare, agriculture, fisheries, food production, cosmetics and beverages – to name but a few.

Early involvement of Australia with Fine Bubble Technology applications and standard-setting should help to set a level playing field, encourage entrants to the market, enhance contributions to the technologies and support early implementation of standards. 

The seventh international symposium coincided with the fourth meeting of ISO/TC 281. This international technical committee now has eight participating countries and 11 observing countries, and we look forward to more participation in the future.

Calling Experts in Systems and Software Engineering


Are you an expert in Systems and Software Engineering with experience in Safety Case applications? We are seeking individuals to join the new working group on Systems & Software Assurance under committee IT-015, Software and Systems Engineering. This group will revise the existing handbook HB 220-2000, Safety Issues for Software and review ISO/IEC 15026-2:2011, Systems and software engineering – Systems and software assurance – Part 2: Assurance case.

For further information or to express interest, please email Aldina Aljukic, National Sector Manager, at aldina.aljukic@standards.org.au or call 02 9237 6081.

Transfer of ANZEx Scheme


Standards Australia has transferred management of the ANZEx Conformity Assessment Scheme to the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand (JAS-ANZ). The ANZEx Scheme is the Australian program for the certification of equipment for explosive atmospheres.

Learn more from our newsroom.

Standards Australia Revising Standardisation Guide 009


As part of Standards Australia's ongoing review of our policies and procedures, Standardisation Guide 009 - Preparation of Standards for Legislative Adoption is currently under review.

The purpose of SG-009 is to assist Technical Committees developing Australian Standards which are specifically intended for reference in legislation, or those that may be considered for legislative reference in the future.

SG-009 provides direction on the appropriate drafting style and terminology to ensure that Australian Standards are:

 a) compatible with legal requirements in all jurisdictions around Australia;
 b) structured in a format suitable for legislative referencing; and
 c) written in a clear, concise and consistent manner, avoiding ambiguity.

This review is timely, following the recently published Best Practice Guide to Using Standards and Risk Assessments in Policy and Regulation, by the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science (DIIS). The DIIS guide provides government policy officers with a process to determine the suitability of standards and risk assessments for use in policy and regulation.

It is proposed that the revised version of SG-009 will incorporate SG-017 Drafting of Standards that may be referenced under WHS Legislation and SG-018 Standards Referenced by Water Utilities, by way of appendix. The principle supporting this change is that one standardisation guide should apply to all standards for legislative adoption. If there are specific requirements by an industry or area of government, these differences should be addressed by an appendix.

Stakeholders and members of the public will have a 6 week opportunity to comment on the revised guide. The commenting period will be open from 30 August 2016 until 11 October 2016.

Download a copy of the draft of SG-009.

If you are interested in providing comment on SG-009 please email claire.gunning@standards.org.au
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.
 
 
 
 

SCS Global Services AS 4707 Accreditation Gives Certificate Holders Access to AFS Brand


Third-party environmental and sustainability certification provider SCS Global Services has become the first international certification body to be accredited by an overseas accreditation body to AS 4707, Chain of custody for forest products.

US-based SCS Global Services operates world-wide and previously provided chain-of-custody (CoC) certification to wood and paper products that met the requirements of the Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) standard. This allowed their Australian certificate holders to access the PEFC logo, but they were not permitted to use the AFS logo.

By obtaining accreditation to AS 4707, SCS Global Services can now provide certification to AS 4707 and issue certificates to AS 4707. As the certificates are endorsed to AS 4707, certificate holders now have access to the AFS brand.

SCS Global Services programs span a wide cross-section of industries, recognising achievements in green building, product manufacturing, forestry, food and agriculture, forestry and retail.

Regional director and senior lead auditor for SCS Global Services in Australia and New Zealand, Nick Capobianco said businesses in all states were increasingly recognising the benefits of chain-of-custody certification.

“CoC certification is kicking along very well on both side of the Tasman,” Mr Capobianco said.

“Certification across the board in forestry, fisheries and agriculture is growing as companies look to add credibility to their products and give consumers a sustainable choice.

“The issues of trust and assurances, particularly among large corporations, that the ingredients used in their products come with lower environmental and social risks has added impetus to the take-up of CoC.”

Mr Capobianco said SCS Global had provided more than 160 companies and organisations with CoC certification in Australia and New Zealand.

Due Diligence: CoC Documentation Process


Under the Illegal Logging Prohibition Regulation 2012, importers of regulated timber products, and processors of Australian harvested logs, are required to establish and maintain a documented due diligence system.

The due diligence system sets out the process by which the importer or processor will carry out due diligence and meet the requirements of the regulation.

The department has determined that under PEFC (including AFS) and FSC chain-of-custody (CoC) standards, certified businesses are required to maintain an equivalent due diligence system.

This means that certified businesses can rely on their existing business practices to comply with the due diligence system requirements under the illegal logging regulation. That is, a separate due diligence system specifically prepared for the illegal logging regulation is not required.

This recognition does not remove the requirement from certification holders to undertake due diligence. CoC certified businesses must comply with the other sections of the regulation – gathering information, risk assessment, risk mitigation and record keeping requirements of the regulation.

Any questions regarding obligations under the illegal logging laws should be directed to the department at ILCA or by phoning 1800 657 313. In addition, you can subscribe to the department’s electronic mailing list to keep up to date on new developments with the illegal logging laws.