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September 2016 Edition

 

CEO Report: Guided by Good Governance

ISO’s 39th General Assembly

Dr Bronwyn Evans named one of Australia’s 100 Women of Influence

In Conversation with John Furbank

Revisions to High Voltage Installations

Complete the APEC Silver Economy Survey

SDAC Appointments Reconfirmed

Medical Devices Forum with the MTAA

 

Have Your Say on the New Drafting Template

Under Review: Aged Standards for Inactive Committees

Competition Policy and Disclosure Guidelines

Looking for Guidance on Drafting Standards?

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

Vale Bryan Nye

CEO Report: Guided by Good Governance


 
Every member of the International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) plays an important role in determining how the organisation operates. As one of the leading national standards bodies (NSBs) in the Asia Pacific region, Standards Australia works with our peer NSBs to strengthen the international standards and conformance system. Together we shape the future of the world’s largest developer of international standards, ISO.

Australia also actively participates in ISO’s global governance at the policy and technical levels. Last week, we were very pleased to announce my appointment as ISO Vice President (Finance) for the term 2017–2018 and that of Adrian O’Connell, Standards Australia’s Deputy CEO, to another term on ISO’s Technical Management Board (for the term 2017–2019), Australia will continue to support and promote good governance and prudent financial management to benefit all ISO members.

At Standards Australia we are committed to the same calibre of effective and open governance for our national work. Just like the 163 NSBs at ISO, we rely on all 75 of our members to identify priorities and suggest ways we can improve. It is essential to have committee members involved at the technical and policy levels of our organisation. Not only does it bring transparency to our process, but committee members provide fundamental insight as the creators and users of our documents.

For Standards Australia and ISO alike, contemporary governance structures help us do what we do best: build trusted national and international standards that are important for the future of all economies and communities. And it is this that we must preserve beyond all else; being able to work freely with our national contributors and international colleagues and peer organisations is our first priority.

I hope you enjoy this edition of E-News.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

ISO’s 39th General Assembly


 
As Australia’s member of ISO, Standards Australia actively participated in ISO’s 39th General Assembly and related meetings which were held in Beijing, China from 9–14 September 2016.

Over 500 delegates from nearly 163 countries attended the multi-day General Assembly and meetings. In addition, representatives from the World Bank Group, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development as well as other international and regional organisations also attended. A key focus of the discussions included ISO’s Strategic Plan for 2016–2020 and ISO’s Regional Engagement Initiative in Asia Pacific.

During the week Standards Australia also participated in a range of meetings covering ISO’s General Assembly, Technical Management Board (TMB) and ISO Developing Countries Committee (DEVCO). The meetings also included breakout sessions on diverse topics such as ISO’s Governance Review, Services, Upcoming High Impact Standards and Engaging Public Authorities. All the sessions are very relevant for Standards Australia and provided the opportunity to share experiences, insights and best practices.

This year’s theme for the open session was "Standards Improve Global Connectivity” where Adrian O’Connell, Standards Australia’s Deputy CEO and Executive Chair of the Pacific Area Standards Congress (PASC) gave a presentation on behalf of PASC titled Facilitating Trade and Enterprise Development. The importance of international standards was further underscored by a speech by Premier Li Keqiang, People’s Republic of China, at the open session on the subject: Standards key for growth of Chinese economy. One of the key takeaways for the audience is that the Chinese Government sees standardisation as a critical success factor for China’s growth.

In addition to the ISO General Assembly itself, Standards Australia took the opportunity to hold some 14 bilateral meetings with other counterparts including meeting the newly appointed Chairman of the Executive Board of DIN (Germany’s National Standards Body), Christoph Winterhalter to discuss Australia’s involvement in Industry 4.0 and other initiatives. Discussions also took place with many of our major trading partners in North Asia and South East Asia.

Other key outcomes included:
CEO Dr Bronwyn Evans appointed as Vice President (Finance) of ISO (PDF)
Standards Australia appointed secretariat of new international technical committee for the development of blockchain standards (PDF).

Dr Bronwyn Evans named one of Australia’s 100 Women of Influence


 
Every year, 100 of Australia’s most influential women are recognised for their dedication to progress and diversity in Australia. This year, we are proud to announce that Dr Bronwyn Evans was selected for the Innovation category of these prestigious awards.

As CEO of Standards Australia, and Chair of the Medical Technologies and Pharmaceuticals Growth Centre and in her past roles, Dr Evans has inspired other women to challenge themselves and the status quo. This is outstanding recognition for Bronwyn, and for the role of standards in innovation.

Congratulations from your team, Bronwyn!

You can learn more about the 100 Women of Influence winners and categories in this afr.com article or through the official website.

In Conversation with John Furbank


 
John Furbank advises and audits industry on compliance with Australian and international technical standards and consumer protection legislation. He previously held a number of senior positions with fair trading and trading standards authorities in Australia and the United Kingdom. John was also Director of Fair Trading in Fiji where he established a national standards authority. He is a member of the Consumers Federation of Australia and sits on a number of Standards Australia committees and ISO international committees. To name a few, John is Head of Delegation to ISO’s Committee on Consumer Policy (COPOLCO) and chairs the Australian mirror committee, and is Chair of ISO PC 294, Guidance on unit pricing, and mirror committee CS-113. John is also a member of Standards Australia’s Standards Development and Accreditation Committee (SDAC).

Standards Australia: In what capacity do you interact with Standards Australia?
John Furbank: As a consumer representative I contribute using my knowledge of consumer rights and Consumer Federation values and policies. For committees concerning consumer safety, such as microwavable heat packs and trampoline park facilities, I also bring my professional experience and expertise. The committee on organic and biodynamic products is a particular passion of mine which, prior to the project commencing, I studied from a both consumer and industry perspective. Additionally, my work advising retailers and importers on compliance with standards involves interpreting and researching standards.

SA: How does your position on SDAC affect your role as a committee member?
JF: As a member of SDAC, I have developed an understanding of how Standards Australia works and its evolving environment to manage changes in government policy, changes in funding and influences of international agreements and international standards. My role as a committee member provides a practical background which I can bring to discussion at SDAC, while my SDAC role provides valuable insight which I take to my committee meetings.

SA: How can international standards serve consumers here in Australia?
JF: International standards are extremely valuable to Australian consumers. A high percentage of products purchased in Australia are manufactured overseas. It is essential that these products are fit for purpose and safe to use. Products that comply with Australian or international standards provide consumers with the confidence that the product will work as claimed, is safe to the user and in conjunction with other equipment, and carries adequate instructions on assembly and use.

It is also valuable for Australia to be represented at international committees and working groups to ensure that Australia has a say in the development of the standard. ISO’s Consumer Policy Committee (COPOLCO) has instigated and assisted in developing some helpful international guides to assist national committees in the development of local standards and a number of initiatives that have resulted in the development of ISO standards.

SA: How can Standards Australia better collaborate with stakeholders?
JF: Standards Australia forums are a great way to get different parties together, highlighting differences and meeting points, and allowing Standards Australia to collaborate with a range of stakeholders. National Sector Managers and Project Managers are key elements in ensuring stakeholders are aware of developments, including both Standards Australia issues and matters concerning the project itself. An essential part of both roles is acknowledging the importance of stakeholders and their relationship with Standards Australia. Consumers are a key stakeholder group in the development of standards, making the product or service relevant to the market and end user. However, not having government or industry financial clout, they require continued Standards Australia support and acknowledgement of their strategic importance.

SA: What do you think is in the future of standardisation?
JF: I believe that standardisation will play a significant role in the economic and social development of Australia. With governments wishing to reduce regulation and cut red tape, standards are important in ensuring that quality, safety and innovation are maintained. As a country that relies on global trade, Standards Australia’s continued involvement in international standards is crucial. The quality of goods we purchase and export are largely dependent on internationally recognised standards. International standards also establish frameworks for establishing best practice in societal issues such as privacy, consumer vulnerability, collaborative economy, sustainability, etc.

Revisions to High Voltage Installations


A revised version of AS 2067:2016, Substations and high voltage installations exceeding 1 kV a.c., was published 14 September 2016. The standard provides common rules for the design and the construction of electrical power installations in systems with nominal voltages above 1 kV a.c. and nominal frequency up to and including 60 Hz.

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

Complete the APEC Silver Economy Survey


Standards Australia and the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science are leading a project to support the APEC’s silver economy. We are now asking stakeholders to assist this initiative by completing our survey.

The purpose of this survey is to enhance coordination and information sharing across the APEC in relation to standardisation and innovation initiatives, policies and programs that can strengthen informed policy making and standards development related to the silver economy.

Open the APEC Silver Economy Survey.

SDAC Appointments Reconfirmed


The Standards Development and Accreditation Committee (SDAC) oversees the processes, policies and procedures of Standards Australia. SDAC is also responsible for the accreditation of other Standards Development Organisations (SDOs).

All SDAC members were recently reconfirmed by the Standards Australia Board:

James Tinslay
Megan Motto
John Furbank
Martin Squire
Kenneth Bowron
Kristin Brookfield
James Thomson
Martin Dwyer
Graeme Drake

More information on the SDAC members is available on our website.

To learn more about the role and responsibilities of SDAC, read the SDAC Charter (PDF).

Medical Devices Forum with the MTAA


On Thursday 6 October Standards Australia will host an open forum on medical devices with the Medical Technology Association of Australia.

The forum will explore the potential adoption of appropriate international standards and consider harmonisation of Australian requirements with ISO standards.

Any interested stakeholders should view the event invite (PDF) for registration details.

Have Your Say on the New Drafting Template


Standards Australia is piloting a new simplified Drafting Template as part of our company-wide digital transformation and the establishment of a streamlined and automated publishing workflow.

The template provides a simpler environment for authoring content using the familiar features of Microsoft Word. Committees can now focus on the technical content while Standards Australia manages the layout and production.

The proposed template is being piloted by a number of technical committees, and we would welcome your feedback in order to fine-tune the template before its release across all committees.

To participate:

Download a copy of the new Standards Australia drafting template, and
Complete the Standards Development Drafting Template Pilot survey. Survey closes 31 October 2016.

Under Review: Aged Standards for Inactive Committees


More Aged Standards are now open for public consultation. This round of review applies specifically to additional non-legislated aged standards for inactive committees.

We are seeking input from stakeholders, nominating organisations and the general public. This consultation period ends on Monday 31 October 2016.

To view Australian Standards proposed for withdrawal, visit our Aged Standards page.

Competition Policy and Disclosure Guidelines


Following work recently completed by ISO, Standards Australia has made improvements to the way it communicates responsibilities with respect to market competition in standards development.

Competition Law Guidelines have been published and are available from our website (PDF). The introduction of the guidelines coincides with improvements in the way that interests are declared through the committee process. From 1 November 2016, a Declaration of Interests Register will be maintained for each committee undertaking national and international work.

Any questions related to the guidelines or interests register can be sent to mail@standards.org.au

Looking for Guidance on Drafting Standards?


Did you know that ISO has a range of useful resources for the development of standards? This includes over 30 guides to assist standards writers on how to deal with specific issues when drafting standards.

The guides, available from the ISO website, give information on a range of topics including how to take account of sustainability in standards, address consumer needs, and draft safety standards.
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.
 
 
 
 

Vale Bryan Nye


It is with great sadness that Standards Australia acknowledges the passing of Bryan Nye OAM.

Bryan was CEO of the Australasian Railway Association from 2003 until his retirement in 2015. He was a passionate advocate of transport reform and played a key role in promoting the ARA among industry and government.

Bryan notably established the Rail Industry Safety and Standards Board (RISSB) in 2005 for the development of national standards for the rail industry.

Bryan was awarded an Order of Australia Medal (OAM) in 2014 for his services to the rail industry and the business sector.

Our thoughts are with his family and friends at this difficult time.