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October 2016 Edition

 

CEO Report: World Standards Day—“Standards Build Trust”

In Conversation with Sarah Dods

80th IEC General Meeting in Frankfurt, Germany

Upcoming Forum: Design Standard for Marinas

Webinar for Committee Members: Standards and Conformance Demystified

Australia Adopts International Standards for Refrigeration Safety

 

Revisions to Inverter Energy Systems Standard

Change to Management of Australian Membership of IECEE Scheme

Team ZERO Competes at F1 in Schools World Finals

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

Pharmacy Guild Seeks Feedback on AS 85000

CEO Report: World Standards Day—“Standards Build Trust”


 
World Standards Day each year is celebrated on 14 October. The theme this year was “standards build trust”.

The World Standards Day message from ISO, IEC and the ITU is:

Standards connect us with reliable modes of communication, codes of practice and trusted frameworks for cooperation. Introducing common interpretations on reciprocal sides of a communication or transaction, standards are essential to mutually beneficial trade and resource efficient international commerce.

Social interaction relies on common respect for fundamental sets of norms, concepts or meanings – international standards codify these norms to ensure that they are accessible to all.

A product or service conforming to an international standard is imbued with a trusted symbol of quality, safety or compatibility. Standards speak to the diversity of our interconnected world, introducing uniformity at the interfaces where we need to be certain that we are speaking on the same terms.

This message reinforces the significant work that is done all around the world, including here in Australia, by the standards community of contributors, experts and standards bodies.

Standards are a vital symbol of safety, quality and collaboration. They build trust by ensuring everyone is using a common language, using a common vocabulary and importantly using a common framework. This is true for manufacturers, consumers, designers, governments and regulators.

As key contributors, all of you, our committee members, nominating organisations and other stakeholders, understand the trust that standards engender across the Australian economy and community. Every standard we develop or adopt consolidates the insights of experts from different backgrounds.

Trust is also built through our net benefit assessment. Every project we undertake is assessed for its positive impact on society. From start to finish, we are committed to developing and adopting the most appropriate standards for the Australian community.

This year, we asked one of our committees why they trust standards. Hear what members of SF-049, Firefighters Personal Protective Equipment, had to say in this video. Thank you to the committee for their participation.

Thank you all for your support and involvement in the development of trusted national and international standards.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

In Conversation with Sarah Dods


 
Dr Sarah Dods is currently the General Manager for eHealth Solutions with Telstra Health. Prior to this role she held various positions with CSIRO, including overseeing the implementation of CSIRO’s new entrepreneurship and innovation program and leading research programs into the Digital Economy and Health Service Delivery. Dr Dods also spent 13 years as an academic researching optical broadband network engineering. She sits on the Australian National Committee to IEC (AU NC IEC), and is the Australian Representative for the IEC Standardization Management Board for Disruptive Innovation.

Standards Australia: Following on the theme of World Standards Day, how do standards build trust in your industry?
Sarah Dods: Standards are incredibly important in the health industry, as the system moves off paper and into the digital world. Standards build trust by providing specified methods for information to be managed, searched, communicated, and transported. As a result patients, clinicians and administrators can rely on the right information getting to the right place, with the right security, at the right time. They can reduce the risk of lost or missed information resulting in poor patient outcomes and also enable competition and interoperability between the growing set of vendors in this space. This creates better value and more choice for the system as a whole.

SA: In what areas is there potential for Australia to excel and support global innovation?
SD: Australia has a reputation as a country that will ‘have a go;’ that will do research, figure out how things work and invent what is needed to solve individual problems. Where we have the potential to improve is in linking inventions and markets: productising those inventions into solutions that address the many different ways a problem appears across an industry. To achieve this we need research and business working much more closely together than it does in Australia today.

SA: How can the AU NC IEC support these areas?
SD: We have the privilege of living right in the middle of the Digital Revolution, which I like to compare with the Industrial Revolution in terms of the disruption to the way we live, work and play. I think we’re only about 20 years into a 50 year transformation, from which the world will emerge looking utterly different. Data is one of the key elements in play – every year we measure more things in new ways, and do new things with that information. The AU NC IEC can create real value by working to anticipate and identify standards that will be needed around the way data fits alongside its whole scope of work, and by considering how data to help interconnect standards to hang together across a whole system, beyond the individual technical requirements of a single activity.

SA: How can Standards Australia better collaborate with stakeholders?
SD: The stakeholders for Standards Australia include everyone who wants to buy something that works, and who need things done in a particular way to keep safe and provide value for money. They also include all those who work to standards, and all those who want to address a particular market in a particular way. Standards Australia has a very important job in this space, as an honest broker, to bring together and help navigate the different perspectives to get to a position on what is practical and useful and best meets the needs of an industry going forward. I’d also like to see a collaboration with our education system to build awareness around the importance and value of standards as part of the key skills children learn about how the world works.

SA: What do you think is in the future of standardisation?
SD: The world is becoming increasingly connected, and I think standards will as well. While countries will still need to think of their local needs, this will need to be balanced against a higher cost of being different from the norm, in terms of lost opportunities to plug into global markets and supply chains, and in healthy competition providing value for their domestic markets. So I expect increasing harmonisation over time. I also expect to see fewer international standards bodies in the future – there are a number at the moment with some considerable overlap, and it would be more efficient for us all if there was a consolidation of those activities where appropriate.

80th IEC General Meeting in Frankfurt, Germany


 
From left: Alexandra Price, Dr Bronwyn Evans and Jemima Jackson
The 80th IEC General Meeting opened at the Frankfurt Festival Hall on Monday night the 10th of October in Frankfurt, Germany. The Australian delegation comprised of Ian Oppermann, Kim Craig, Ian Forte, Dr Bronwyn Evans, Karen Batt, Jonathan Avery and more than 30 other Australian delegates who would be attending technical meetings throughout the week. Of the delegates, Jemima Jackson and Alexandra Price both participated in the Young Professionals program as well as attending technical committee meetings.

The IEC General Meeting is held every year and this year’s focus was on connecting communities and reinventing standardisation. During the week, the German National Committee hosted a reinvention laboratory to discuss and share ideas for the future of standardisation. The Technical Committee of the future means greater online collaboration and overcoming conflicting time zones, schedules and resources with cutting edge solutions.

In addition to the IEC GM, Australia held bilateral discussions with Ecuador, New Zealand, Japan, Singapore, Korea, the Gulf States, Denmark, Sweden and Canada with the goal of strengthening ties and working together strategically for outcomes of mutual benefit.

Australia, with the United States, Mexico and China also hosted the Pacific Area Standards Conference (PASC), an informal get-together of the Pacific Rim Standards bodies, with the aim of fostering regional bonds and strategic alignment. This is a traditional event held at every IEC GM, and was a great success for the regional collaboration.

Upcoming Forum: Design Standard for Marinas


 
On 4 November 2016 Standards Australia is hosting a forum to discuss the future of AS 3962, Guidelines for design of marinas. Last published in 2001, this document needs to be updated to accommodate current practices in the recreational marine industry.

All relevant stakeholder groups are invited to participate. View the event invite (PDF) for more information.

Webinar for Committee Members: Standards and Conformance Demystified


 
Are you working on Standards Australia committees and wondering how standards and conformance fit together? Do you need more information on how best to write requirements to support conformance activities in your industry?

Standards Australia has teamed up with Graeme Drake (Chair of QR-010, Conformity Assessment) to deliver important information for all standards writers regarding what can and can’t be included in Australian Standards. Don’t miss this one!

See our conference page for all webinar information and registration instructions. Spaces are limited, so register today to avoid disappointment.

Webinar details
Date: Monday 5 December 2016
Time: 12pm – 1pm

Australia Adopts International Standards for Refrigeration Safety


Significant changes have been made to refrigeration standards after strong industry and government engagement. As direct or modified adoptions of international standards, AS/NZS ISO 817 supersedes AS/NZS 1677.1:1998, Refrigerating systems – Refrigerant classification and the AS/NZS 5149 series supersedes AS/NZS 1677.2:1998, Refrigerating systems – Safety requirements for fixed applications.

More information can be found in our media release (PDF).

Revisions to Inverter Energy Systems Standard


The revised edition of AS/NZS 4777.1, Grid connection of energy systems via inverters, Part 1: Installation requirements, was recently published. AS/NZS 4777.1 covers inverter energy systems (IES) connected to the grid at low voltage and clarifies requirements for energy sources other than photovoltaic (PV).

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

Change to Management of Australian Membership of IECEE Scheme


Management of Australia’s membership of the IECEE Conformity Assessment Scheme was recently transferred from Standards Australia to JAS-ANZ.

The IECEE Conformity Assessment Scheme is designed to facilitate certification or approval according to IEC standards.

The transfer of management was the result of Standards Australia stakeholder consultations and an application made by JAS-ANZ to the Australian National Committee to the IEC (AU NC IEC) in 2016.

Learn more in our statement (PDF).

Team ZERO Competes at F1 in Schools World Finals


 
Standards Australia is proud to sponsor Team ZERO, Australia's F1 in Schools Team. The team of three recently competed in the 2016 World Finals, the largest secondary school engineering competition in the world.

The team was required to design, test, manufacture, market and race a miniature F1 car. They placed 8th out of 39 countries – an incredible achievement on behalf of Australia. Congratulations to the team. You can check out their car design in this Facebook video.
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.
 
 
 
 

Pharmacy Guild Seeks Feedback on AS 85000


The Pharmacy Guild of Australia, on behalf of the standards committee, is seeking feedback on the proposed revised draft of the Australian Standard for Quality Care Pharmacy.

The proposed draft AS 85000:2016 Quality Care Community Pharmacy Standard, seeks to promote flexibility and innovation within the industry, and aims to ensure relevance for at least five years. The draft standard also seeks to align with key strategic focuses of the Australian Government and relevant health agencies.

The draft standard seeks to outline the business framework required to operate a community pharmacy in Australia. It also seeks to recognise the diverse business models within community pharmacy, whilst promoting community safety and quality use of medicines.

The draft standard is considered relevant for all community pharmacies within Australia, and is designed to be adaptable to all business models also promoting innovation within community pharmacy.

The draft standard does not seek to override or replace existing regulations or industry specific guidelines and as such should be read in conjunction with these documents. It does, however, form the framework to support accreditation systems for Australian Community Pharmacies.

The Guild on behalf of the standards committee is inviting feedback to support the increasing occurrence of complex compounding within community pharmacy. Therefore two draft standards have been proposed.

Option A – complex compounding is integrated into the draft AS 85000:2016 Quality Care Community Pharmacy Standard in recognition that pharmacies that undertake complex compounding need to consider this service in all aspects of their business model. Download Option A (PDF).

Option B – complex compounding forms a select section of the draft AS 85000:2016 Quality Care Community Pharmacy Standard in recognition of the specialist skills and service models required to provide complex compounding. Download Option B (PDF).

Individuals or organisations wishing to provide feedback are requested to complete the online survey. The consultation period for feedback on both options will remain open until Monday 5 December, with all submissions considered on completion of the review.