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December 2016/January 2017 Edition

 

CEO Report: Principles in Practice in 2016

Standards, They’ve Got You Covered

In Conversation with Michael McLean

Standards for Steel Structures

Seeking Input on Ageing Societies

Blockchain: Next Steps

Hoverboard Standard Published to Address Safety Issues

 

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

Second SDO Round Table Set for 2017

AFS Expansion of 16 Million ha Tops Growth of Certified Forests

CEO Report: Principles in Practice in 2016


 
Thank you for your time, energy and contributions throughout a busy 2016. I appreciate all of your inputs and insights. Together with our members, stakeholders and international counterparts we’ve achieved so much for Australia in 2016. Wishing you a Merry Christmas and a safe and happy holiday.

My childhood holidays were often spent with all nine of us packed into a caravan enjoying such delights as the Big Banana and the Big Pineapple—if only I had known the number of standards behind caravans alone it would have spared me from another session of “I-Spy”. Today we may celebrate our holidays differently, but standards continue to keep us safe.

You may recall last year that hoverboards were a popular present under the Christmas tree. However, when recalls were issued and safety concerns were raised, it was recognised that no electrical safety standard existed for these toys.

This year we enter the Christmas season with a newly published standard on hoverboards, AS/NZS 60335.2.201-2016. In fact, this Australian and New Zealand Standard is being used as a model for an international standard for hoverboards that the IEC will develop. The rapid development of AS/NZS 60335.2.201-2016 demonstrates a number of important principles: Australia is setting the agenda not just for national needs but also internationally; using standards as a timely solution to improve safety for our communities; and staying up to speed with new technologies. I am proud that the integrity of our process means that the community has trust and confidence in what we do and wants to work with us.

Here is some simple advice (PDF) for the holidays to keep you and your families safe. Have a happy Christmas and New Year.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

Standards, They’ve Got You Covered


 
Sunscreen is essential for Australian life. Like many products and services, sunscreen is made to standards…

Standards Australia recently created a video explaining what a standard is and how they are developed, using the example of sunscreen.

Please feel free to share it with your own networks to help spread the message… and the sunscreen!

In Conversation with Michael McLean


 
For our final ‘In Conversation’ for 2016 we sat down with Michael McLean, Managing Director of McLean Management Consultants. Mike is Convener to an ISO Taskforce made up of 35 nations revising the “Integrated Use of Management System Standards” (IUMSS) Handbook. He also sits on ISO TC 176/SC 2 Working Group 26 on the revision of ISO 10005 for quality plans. Nationally he is a member of Standards Australia QR-008 for Quality Systems and is now leading the team revising the Handbook 139, Guidance on integrating the requirements of quality, environment, and health and safety management system standards.

Standards Australia: Tell us about some of the changes happening to management system standards.
Michael McLean: One of the other major changes happening now is the greater emphasis on the ‘process approach’. Previously consultants and certification bodies found it easier if systems were established based on the clauses of the standard, a clause-by-clause approach. The outcome was that businesses missed out on the benefits and management system approaches have gained a poor reputation. The ‘process approach’, now an actual ISO 9001:2015 requirement, means that organisations should document their management systems based on their own processes and integrate any requirements from their own systems or external standards and regulations into the management system.

SA: What is the value of a management system standard?
MM: Standards can serve such a great value to businesses but to date, it is recognised that there has been a misinterpretation and negative narrative around the colloquial term of ‘ISO’. ISO refers to the International Organization for Standardization and not just Quality Management or ISO Documentation or even ‘the constraints of having ISO’. It is sad that management systems have such a bad reputation as management system standards help businesses to be more profitable and better defined, measured and transparent – if done correctly. They are written by people with experience in business. Behind every standard is academic rigour and thought leadership, researched and drawn from relevant industry experience. Management system standards allow businesses to connect the output of their processes to the input of another process, reducing waste and eliminating confusion along the way and providing quality input to their customers’ processes. These benefits are realised across the business.

SA: Why did the IUMSS Taskforce recently visit a local bakery?
MM: A core part of the Handbook on the Integrated Use of Management System Standards is the inclusion of hypothetical case studies of a “Jim the Baker” who runs a bakery and learns how to integrate his management systems in order to create a better business. The Taskforce working on the handbook visited Pinnacle Bakery & Integrated Ingredients’ factory in Botany, NSW. The visit highlighted the particular issues faced by actual businesses when it comes to integrating standards. It was an excellent example of how ISO and Australian Standards help businesses control their processes and meet diverse customer and other stakeholder requirements in the real world.

SA: How can Standards Australia better collaborate with stakeholders and promote standards?
MM: I would like to see continued emphasis on international harmonisation to help Australia be export-ready and confident in our products and services. This can be considered as integral to various industry global supply chains as we are seeing in the current capital and equipment investment and acquisition for the defence sector. Standards Australia is key to keeping Australian businesses internationally competitive in the context of international trade partnerships and agreements. Australia has recognised also the need to have standards that are internationally comparable or in-sync with those standards for information and cyber security in food, energy, cyber security; smart infrastructure; corporate governance; environment; social media “comms and apps”; workplace safety and engagement to name but a few. Standards Australia does and will represent a body that people and organisations can trust; and promotes Australia as being seen as a stable and secure country with capable industries that can meet the standards required to participate, grow and be sustainable in global supply chains.

Standards for Steel Structures


 
Standards Australia continues to work closely with the Australian steel sector, with two major achievements this month relating to steel structures.

This first is the conclusion of a work program to develop a new Australian and New Zealand Standard on the post design phase of structural steel projects: AS/NZS 5131:2016, Fabrication and erection of steel structures. Learn more about the new standard in our media release.

The other announcement is the release of a public comment draft for AS/NZS 4600, Cold-formed steel structures. The main changes to the document and further information can be found in our statement (PDF).

Seeking Input on Ageing Societies


ISO recently set up a Strategic Advisory Group on Ageing Societies to help inform its future work in supporting this demographic transition. Australia has two representatives working on this important global initiative.

We are now seeking input from stakeholders across all sectors, not just health, on the current research and knowledge in relation to ageing societies.

Find out more in ISO Strategic Advisory Group on Ageing Societies (DOCX), and access the gap analysis spreadsheet (XLSX). Feedback is required by 18 January 2016.

Contact Damian Fisher at damian.fisher@standards.org.au for more information.

Blockchain: Next Steps


With the world first International Blockchain Standards meeting set to be held in Sydney in April 2017, Standards Australia will be facilitating a number of key activities to support the Blockchain Standards Initiative (PDF). The first of these will be the development of a Blockchain Standards Roadmap.

The roadmapping exercise, involving the undertaking of a survey, the hosting of a workshop and the delivery of a recommendations report, is designed to identify key stakeholder issues and develop a priority list of standards for development to support blockchain technology. All relevant Australian stakeholders are invited to participate in the road mapping exercise by completing the survey and attending the workshop (PDF).

The key dates for the Blockchain Standards Roadmap activities:

Survey: closing date 10 February 2017
Workshop: 17 February 2017
Blockchain Standards Roadmap Recommendations Report: release 28 February 2017

Hoverboard Standard Published to Address Safety Issues


 
In recent years battery powered self-balancing personal transport devices, otherwise known as hoverboards, have grown in popularity across the world. However, as the safety of these devices was questioned, it was identified that consumers and manufacturers alike could benefit from the development of a standard.

Standards Australia recently published a new standard: AS/NZS 60335.2.201, Household and similar electrical appliances – Safety – Part 2.201: Particular requirements for battery powered self-balancing personal transport devices. Standards Australia thanks Standards New Zealand for managing the committee, EL-002, Safety of Household and Similar Electrical and Small Power Transformers and Power Supplies, who were responsible for developing this important standard.

Learn more in our media release (PDF).
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.
 
 
 
 

Second SDO Round Table Set for 2017


The first successful Standards Development Organisation (SDO) Round Table in 2016 focused on accreditation and audit processes. Next year, Standards Australia will be hosting a second SDO Round Table covering topics such as:

SDO Project Prioritisation Systems;
Standards Australia’s Standards Development Processes; and
Public outreach and SDO promotion;

There will also be an opportunity for open forum discussions amongst the SDOs.

The Round Table will be held on 20 February 2017. Further information can be found in the event flyer (PDF).

AFS Expansion of 16 Million ha Tops Growth of Certified Forests


 
PEFC International CEO Ben Gunneberg (left) and PEFC director Sheam Satkuru-Granzella present a certificate of appreciation for AFS’s forest certification growth to Dr Hans Drielsma, chairman, and Simon Dorries, CEO, Australian Forestry Standard Ltd, during the PEFC dialogue in Bali.
The Australian Forestry Standard scheme with an expansion of more than 16 million ha certified was awarded top prize for growth at the PEFC stakeholder dialogue in Bali in November.

This was the highlight of a year when PEFC members smashed records for new areas under forest certification in many countries.

“I am both ecstatic and delighted we have received this award,” AFS Ltd CEO Simon Dorries said during a week of PEFC forest celebrations in the Indonesian island province.

The new expansion now gives Australia around 27 million ha certified under the AFS scheme.

“These new hectares are in fact from just one certificate holder, bringing almost 17 million ha of additional forest within Australia,” Mr Dorries said.

“What is really interesting is the motivation to gain PEFC certification – to demonstrate responsible land management to society, not simply the ability to produce certified wood for the market.

“This shows the great flexibility and multi-faceted nature of the PEFC system to be able to deliver such outcomes.”

Second and third place winners did not do badly either, with the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and PEFC Russia adding 8.2 million ha and 8.1 million has of certified forests respectively, an amount that in previous years would have easily given them first place.

“It is fantastic to see such brilliant growth this year,” PEFC International CEOs Ben Gunneberg said following the certificate awards ceremony. “As the world’s leading forest certification system, with 300 million ha of forest certified to PEFC, we normally experience more steady growth, with any large increases due to newly-endorsed members,” he said.

“This year was different, with all three of the winning countries in fact being long-established members. This shows the true strength and dedication of the organisation. We never stand still and all of us throughout the PEFC alliance are constantly striving to do better, to reach more people, and get more forests managed sustainably.”

In the growth of chain of custody programs, the honour went to PEFC Germany, which added 91 CoC certificates. PEFC Spain placed second followed by the China Forest Certification Council (CFCC) in third.

The figures show the global growth of PEFC certification – forest area 300 million ha; forest owners 750,000; companies (CoC) 18,700.