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April 2017 Edition

 

CEO Report: From Bridges to Blockchain

In Conversation with Wije Ariyaratne

First Release of Digital Repository – SIM

Strengthening Our Partnership with ISO

Bridge Code Helps to Build Australia

International Conference Promotes Blockchain Standards

Supporting APEC’s Silver Economy

Industry 4.0 Recommendations Report

A New Learning Experience

Changes Within Standards Development Team

 

Congratulations to the 2016–2017 Young Leaders

Call for Interest in New International Committee on Chain of Custody

Work Continues on Important Timber Treatment Standards

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

Certified: Worth the Paper it’s Printed On

Queensland Cypress Sector Considers Group Certification

CEO Report: From Bridges to Blockchain


 
April has been a rewarding month with the completion of a number of high-impact projects and initiatives.

We were pleased to publish the 2017 Australian Bridge Code, an important document for industry. I would like to acknowledge and applaud the technical committee BD-090, Bridge Design, on this accomplishment. The end result is a comprehensive Code that supports Australia’s needs and serves as a model for other countries.

We were also delighted to host a number of our international colleagues. This included the first meeting of the international committee on blockchain, ISO/TC 307, Blockchain and Electronic Distributed Ledger Technologies, which was followed by the International Blockchain Conference. Both featured thought leaders from around the world.

We also hosted an APEC workshop in partnership with the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science. The workshop was under the umbrella of the APEC Sub-Committee on Standards and Conformance and focused on the role of standards and innovation for driving APEC’s silver economy. The importance of this topic was highlighted in the workshop issues paper with the following quote: “The ageing of the global population represents the greatest social, economic and political transformation of our time”.

Dr Zhang Xiaogang, ISO President, attended both events. During his visit Dr Zhang reinforced the importance of international standards for the global economy and he acknowledged Standards Australia’s strong relationship with ISO and the resulting benefit for Australian stakeholders. This visit by the ISO President also provided an opportunity for discussions with senior leaders of key government departments.

We are now preparing for our mid-year Council meeting to be held in Canberra on 26 May. We look forward to seeing all of our Councillors at this important event. The mid-year Council meeting is an excellent opportunity for us to engage in a dialogue about Standards Australia’s future.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

In Conversation with Wije Ariyaratne


 
Adjunct Professor Wije Ariyaratne has over 45 years of service with the Roads & Maritime Services of NSW and its predecessors. As their Principal Engineer Bridges, his expertise lies in bridge engineering covering design, construction, maintenance and operation of bridges. He is a Fellow of Engineers Australia and an Adjunct Professor of Engineering at the University of Technology Sydney. He is also an Industry Advisory Net member of University of Technology Sydney, University of Western Sydney and University of NSW, Member of Australian Structural Health Monitoring and Member of Advisory Panel for CRC on Bridges and Structures. Prof Ariyaratne is Chair of the Technical Committee BD-090, Bridge Code, responsible for the 2017 version of the Australian Bridge Code.

Standards Australia: Tell us about the recent revision of the Bridge Code.
Wije Ariyaratne: Under my leadership BD-090 recently revised all seven parts of the Australian Bridge Code and developed two new parts covering the rehabilitation and strengthening of bridges as well as timber bridges. The 2017 publication comprehensively addresses areas like climate change, sustainability, safety-in-design, new technology and new construction materials (like composites, engineered timber, and rehabilitation materials). The working groups consisted of experienced members from the community: members of road and rail agencies, consulting engineers, bridge builders, and university academics, both from Australia and New Zealand.

I would like to thank both Standards Australia and Austroads for the opportunity they gave me to lead this interesting and challenging task and see it to completion. I am certain it will be one of the most comprehensive bridge codes in the world and that it will be appreciated by the entire international community.

SA: What is the significance of the new Bridge Code for Australia?
WA: There are over 50,000 bridges in Australia alone. The 2017 Bridge Code provides a consistent, harmonised, and cost effective approach to design, operate and manage bridges in Australia. Our Bridge Code is unique with regard to design load - SM 1600 (160 tons)—the heaviest in the world. There’s good reason for this heavy loading. Australia is a continent and an island with a large land mass. With an extensive road network of over 900,000 km, most of the freight is transported by road over large distances by heavy vehicles. Therefore our requirements are slightly different from the rest of the world, and I am proud that the new AS (/NZS) 5100 series now addresses this fact.

SA: What were some of the challenges you encountered during the revision and how did you overcome them?
WA: Standard development is based on key principles. The process must be transparent and consensus-based with a balanced group of experts. The challenge is to provide a neutral meeting ground while also ensuring all views have a seat at the table. In order to meet stakeholder needs and follow the robust process I worked closely with the Standards Australia project team (June Chen and Joan Beal). I also supported the subcommittee chairs, particularly if their specific work was affecting the delivery of the overall project.

SA: Why are standards important for your sector?
WA: Standards are not only important for my sector, they’re important to the entire community. Standards help design, build and maintain public assets in order to achieve value for money, sustainability, performance and safety. They also help Australia stay aligned with accepted international practice and to encompass new technology and materials.

First Release of Digital Repository – SIM


Standards Australia is delighted to announce the successful internal release of the Standards Information Management portal (SIM), the new digital repository which will underpin Standards Australia’s content development and management systems as we progress with our digital transformation.

This first release of SIM provides an online, searchable catalogue of national and international standards, and will be the foundation for multiple value-add capabilities and integrations.

SIM is built on MarkLogic, a best-in-class database, and is the first deliverable from Standards Australia's partnership with MarkLogic Corporation, as announced in our media release (PDF).

This is a major milestone in our digital transformation program, and while the first release is internal only, for two weeks from Monday 1 May committee members can trial SIM – just look for the SIM terminal on level 10 of the Standards Australia office.

It will soon be released to all committees – more information to follow.

Strengthening Our Partnership with ISO


 
Dr Zhang Xiaogang visited Australia for the first time as President of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Dr Zhang was accompanied by Mr Kolin Low, Regional Manager, ISO Regional Engagement – Asia.

Dr Zhang’s itinerary included:
  • Opening address at the International Blockchain Conference organised by Standards Australia
  • Standards and Conformance Roundtable with the CEOs of Australia’s Technical Infrastructure Alliance
  • Commonwealth Government Roundtable meeting hosted by Mr Mike Lawson, Deputy Secretary, Department of Industry, Innovation and Science
  • Meetings with Standards Australia’s Executive and Senior Management team
Dr Zhang’s visit was an opportunity to brief the Australian Government on ISO's Strategic Plan for 2016-2020 and its work in supporting national standards bodies in the Asia Pacific region.

Standards Australia also discussed Australia’s growing involvement in ISO and how the two bodies can better support one another.

Bridge Code Helps to Build Australia


 
The highly anticipated AS(/NZS) 5100:2017, Bridge design series (also known as the ‘Bridge Code’) was recently published. All seven parts of the 2004 version were revised and two new parts were added.

Learn more in this video or in our media release (PDF).

International Conference Promotes Blockchain Standards


 
The International Blockchain Conference was held at the International Convention Centre in Sydney on 6 April 2017. The event which was hosted by Standards Australia, featured speakers from throughout Asia, Europe, Australia and the Americas. It capped off a busy week of blockchain standards activities including the world first meeting of ISO/TC 307, Blockchain and Electronic Distributed Ledger Technologies, which was held in Sydney on 3–5 April 2017.

To hear from some of the leading minds on blockchain and distributed ledger technologies from around the globe who participated in the International Blockchain Conference, see our wrap-up video. The presentations delivered by international guest speakers at the conference can be viewed on the Standards Australia website.

Supporting APEC’s Silver Economy


 
Standards Australia in association with the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science held an APEC Workshop on 4–5 April 2017 in Sydney. The workshop discussed the role of Standards and Innovation for Driving APEC’s Silver Economy. The workshop was attended by 51 key stakeholders from government, regulators, national standards bodies (NSBs), trade promotion organisations, industry, consumer and academia representing fifteen APEC member economies.

The workshop was a response to the key findings of the APEC Silver Economy Issues Paper (PDF) which was published in March 2017. The Hon Craig Laundy MP, Assistant Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, welcomed the workshop participants via video.

The workshop’s main aim was to foster a greater understanding of the complex and multifaceted issues, challenges and business opportunities by stakeholders to advance the development of market based standardisation and innovation solutions. A workshop and recommendations report will be published mid-year and submitted to APEC.

Industry 4.0 Recommendations Report


 
Standards Australia has released its Industry 4.0 Recommendations Report (PDF) highlighting key recommendations for Australia to gain opportunities created from Industry 4.0.

A New Learning Experience


 
The Standards Australia Academy will be launched for our stakeholders at the end of May 2017. The Academy aims to engage and support our committee members by providing training on our processes, people and products. It will be managed on a digital platform and will be continually updated and developed.

The Academy offers our committee members the following benefits:
  • Access the right course when you need it
  • Learn at your own pace
  • Access essential learning for new committee members
  • Be the first to know when interactive workshops are scheduled
For a preview watch this short video.

Changes Within Standards Development Team


 
Back Row: Jo-Ellen Courtney, Eddie McGuire, Daniel Chidgey, Joan Beal. Front Row: Moitri Pal, Manjoo Lalwani, Jay Lim.
Changes have been made to the structure and leadership of the Standards Development team, as reflected in this functional organisational chart (PDF).

A new role, Senior Manager, Standards Development, has been created reporting to the General Manager Operations. Daniel Chidgey has been appointed to this role and will lead the Standards Development team responsible for the delivery of national and international standards development projects.

He will be supported by Program Managers, teams of Project Managers and other coordinator staff, for the delivery of standards development solutions. This part of the functional structure has not changed.

The Standards Development team is very much focused on productivity and meeting the needs of the contributors in our standards development process.

Congratulations to the 2016–2017 Young Leaders


 
Back Row: Sinisa Dujakovic, Baoying Tong, John Meerabux, Mark Reggers, Jake Ring. Front Row: Rachel Nicoll, Brooke Veliscek, Catherine Carlos, Mark O’Reilly. Missing: Duwayno Robertson
Our 2016–2017 Young Leaders recently completed this year’s program. Their final session focused on continuing the Young Leaders’ careers in the world of standards. We look forward to seeing them on our technical committees in the future.

Applications for the 2017–2018 Young Leaders program are now open. Details on the program are available on our website or email Young.Leaders@standards.org.au for more information.

Call for Interest in New International Committee on Chain of Custody


A new international committee (ISO/PC 308, Chain of Custody) was created last year by ISO members. The new committee held their first meeting in early March 2017. The scope of the committee was confirmed by ISO’s Technical Management board as follows:

“Standardization in the field of Chain of Custody (CoC), including terminology, principles, requirements for and control systems used by supply chain actors with regards to the management of products in terms of their specified characteristics. The work is intended to be applicable to all products, whereas services are excluded.

The objective of the committee is to define a generic CoC process framework, which serves a wide range of sectors, raw materials and end products, and covers specific product characteristics, to enhance the transparency, process efficiency and comparability of CoC models.”

Standards Australia has received expressions of interest from a number of organisations regarding Australian involvement. We are keen to hear from other organisations who may be interested in shaping the Australian position in this important work on international chain of custody requirements.

For more information please contact Karen Batt, International Development Manager, at karen.batt@standards.org.au

Work Continues on Important Timber Treatment Standards


Standards Australia recently published amendments to the AS(/NZS) 1604:2012 series titled Specification for preservative treatment. This five part series specifies requirements for:
  • Part 1 – Sawn and round timber
  • Part 2 – Reconstituted wood-based products
  • Part 3 – Plywood
  • Part 4 – Laminated veneer lumber (LVL)
  • Part 5 – Glued laminated timber products
These are key documents for the timber treatment industry, product certification bodies assessing product compliance and also specifiers of timber products in building and related applications. They are referenced in a number of primary reference documents in the NCC: Building Code of Australia.

Peter Juniper, Chair of the committee TM-012, Timber Grading and Preservation, explained that “a further major revision has recently been initiated and it is currently proposed that all parts of the revised series will be published as AS/NZS standards.

“This is an important step forward in the ongoing development of timber treatment standards for Australia and New Zealand. The committee is now focused on a major review to adopt a more performance orientated approach and the inclusion of timber treatment verification methods.”
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from March 2017 (PDF):

Standards Australia: Refresh of international net benefit cases
A new Technical Committee ISO/TC 286 Collaborative business relationship management is established
Setup of new ISO/IEC JTC 1 Subcommittee on Internet of Things and related technologies

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.
 
 
 
 

Certified: Worth the Paper it’s Printed On


 
Stephanie Walls … clients are demanding certified and carbon neutral paper products.
“We’re delighted Australian printers are supporting certified paper products,” AFS Ltd CEO Simon Dorries said after receiving copies of the AFS Bulletin produced on ‘high white’ laser stock from a Melbourne-based paper distributor.

Supplied by the BJ Ball Group, which has PEFC/AFS chain-of-custody certification, the paper carries the AFS, PEFC and Australia-made logos.

“The paper and packaging industry is helping to ensure its products are Australian made and are from properly managed forests,” Mr Dorries said.

Owner-manager of Worldwide Printing Solutions at Hamilton Stephanie Walls said her clients were demanding, more than ever, that paper products were certified and carbon neutral.

“The certified paper from BJ Ball is a valuable product for our business,” Stephanie said.

“Also, our NoCO2 accreditation from the Carbon Reduction Institute certifies that we are a carbon neutral business. This means that every tonne of greenhouse gas that we are responsible for is 100% offset. It also means that we have made an annual commitment to keep reducing our carbon footprint, reducing our impact on the environment.”

The BJ Ball Group has been providing environmentally-responsible papers from around the world for more than 90 years.

The group’s national customer service manager Brooke Schade said the digital print market had taken an exponential leap.

“Technology and demand is spreading and BJ Ball’s small and wide format digital continues to deliver ‘green’ innovative print media products and services,” Brooke said.

“Our chain-of-custody policy has been in place for many years.”

PEFC International secretary-general Ben Gunneberg was in Australia recently to confer with certified domestic companies in the paper and packaging supply chain. In Sydney, he spoke at AusPak, the largest processing and packaging event in the southern hemisphere.

Queensland Cypress Sector Considers Group Certification


 
Gathering at a cypress certification meeting in western Queensland are, from left, Todd Lewis, Walker Cypress, Mitchell Goodchild, Yuleba Cypress, Roger Brent, Hurfords, Mick Stephens, CEO, Timber Queensland, Vic Gersekowski, Vic’s Timber, Simon Dorries, CEO Australian Forestry Standard Ltd, Ian Wilson, Injune Cypress, and Ian Hornick, Hornick Cypress.
Processors in the western Queensland cypress sector are considering a low-cost group chain-of-custody certification scheme following a presentation at Dalby by Australian Forestry Standard CEO Simon Dorries.

There are around 2.5 million ha of cypress-dominated forests in Australia, including cypress in forests mixed with eucalypts.

Management practices by both the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and the Forestry Commission NSW are certified under the AFS standard AS 4708.

“The group AFS scheme can reduce certification costs by 60-70% for individual processors,” Mr Dorries said.

Timber Queensland is helping to facilitate the scheme for cypress division members, which tracks certified wood through their businesses.

“Reception to the scheme was very positive,” TQ CEO Mick Stephens said.

Mr Dorries said the scheme could get off the ground after group meetings with cypress producers and some random audits.

“There will be lot of cost savings here and it will allow cypress mills to use the AFS-Australian Made logo on products stamped with AFS certification compliance,” Mr Dorries said.

“It’s a simple, yet rigorous system that covers all steps in the supply chain.

“Increasingly, consumers are demanding that the wood products they buy are made from timber that can be traced back to a sustainable and legal source.”

The group certification proposal mirrors a successful scheme in Tasmania, managed by Fine Timbers Australia, which covers more than 40 sites ranging from the smallest user of high-end specialty timbers building custom guitars to the largest sawmilling enterprises and wood fibre exporters.

The Tassie scheme now covers more than 40 sites ranging from the smallest user of high end specialty timbers building custom guitars to the largest sawmilling enterprises and wood fibre exporters.

Information about chain-of-custody certification can be directed to AFS Ltd on (07) 3359 1758 or email Simon.Dorries@forestrystandard.org.au