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August 2017 Edition

 

CEO Report: Our Governance Framework

In Conversation with Brandon Hitch

Technical Governance Review

Future Development of Onsite Battery Storage Standard

New Meeting Rooms At Standards Australia

Submitting a Project Proposal

Revision of Standard for Plugs and Socket Outlets

 

Welcoming our 2017–18 Young Leaders

Indonesia–Australia Standards Mapping Project

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

Procurement Rules Big Win for Australian Standards

Revision of Quality Care Community Pharmacy Standard

CEO Report: Our Governance Framework


 
At the time of writing we have just concluded our Nominating Organisation Forums for 2017. A great success especially if the measure is honest and constructive engagement from our key contributors.

The conversations ranged across topics like digital and distribution, about better access to all standards, incremental improvements to existing processes and ways to engage entirely new sectors. We talked about how we manage our standards development process, particularly the governance framework.

Further to this, last week we released an issues paper on our technical governance. This paper is a foundational piece for the Standards Australia to come.

Our Strategic Plan clearly sets out our ambitions for the Standards Australia of 2020. Ensuring that we have rules, processes, operating models and governance structures that support consensus built outcomes across the economy will be key to our success. Our current model has served us well, and has remained largely the same since 1922.

The question that we are asking everyone is; “Are there incremental changes, or more fundamental changes to our technical governance that we need to consider?”.

As I talk to our technical contributors there are some common themes. The first is that standards remain core to many industrial, government and social initiatives.

The second is that industry participants, governments and community interests are under ever-increasing time pressure; and as a result, the best use of that time is becoming a challenge, and an opportunity for change, all in one.

The third theme is the rise of new areas of technical endeavour across horizontal areas of work. It’s fairly easy to identify how to develop standards in single areas for defined products and issues. However, when you start talking about ‘smart cities’, ‘connected communities’ ‘digital hospitals’ and ‘the internet of things’ you start talking about a different way of engaging with communities and a different way of doing things.

I would encourage you all to review the issues paper and engage in the technical governance review process. Dot points on single issues are just as important as comprehensive responses to all 19 questions.

We are shaping the future of Australia’s Standards Australia and your feedback and insights have never been more important.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

In Conversation with Brandon Hitch


 
Brandon Hitch has been CEO of the Crane Industry Council of Australia (CICA) since 2014. He joined CICA in 2011 as a CraneSafe Engineer and in 2012 was promoted to CraneSafe General Manager overseeing the technical and day-to-day operations of the CraneSafe program. Prior to joining CICA, Brandon was a Senior Engineer with Cargotec Australia working on their Hiab and Kalmar load handling equipment. Brandon currently represents CICA on ME-005, Cranes, and its subcommittees, including his role as Chair of ME-005-05, Mobile Cranes and member of ISO TC 96, Cranes.

Standards Australia: In what capacity do you interact with Standards Australia?
Brandon Hitch: Standards form the backbone for the design and safe use of cranes and lifting equipment in Australia. As the peak industry body, CICA engages with Standards Australia on a regular basis regarding all crane and lifting gear standards. I am honoured to be personally involved on standards committees. My predecessor contributed for more than 40 years, so I have some big shoes to fill! I have had the privilege to attend ISO meetings for the past two years, and coincidentally my first meeting was held in Sydney and CICA sponsored the networking event.

I have also participated as a mentor in the Young Leaders Program. It was great to see an emerging leader gain an early understanding on how standards are developed. I still keep in contact with my mentee to discuss his involvement in standards development.

SA: How does CICA engage with and manage their representatives on standards committees?
BH: CICA representatives are selected to serve on standards committees based on their industry expertise. The CICA Board of Directors reviews and approves who represents CICA. This is taken very seriously to ensure the industry’s voice is heard over an individual’s opinion. A Standards Report is provided to our Directors for review on a regular basis. When standards are open for public comment, CICA informs its members as an opportunity for experts to voice their individual opinions. We try to maintain consistent representation throughout the duration of any standards project.

SA: Tell us about your own experience moving from technical to management roles.
BH: Managing CICA involves making sound, logical arguments on matters that impact our members. Being in a management role has required a more cognitive awareness of “soft skills” that some engineers struggle to grasp. At the same time, not every technically minded person has the social skills of Sheldon Cooper. It’s about being mindful of your flaws. It is also important to have a team with a strong, shared vision. Whether I’m managing a technical project or a business project, I know the same core elements for success apply, based on CICA’s mission and vision.

SA: How can Standards Australia better collaborate with stakeholders?
BH: Standards Australia should continue to form working groups and drafting groups to manage specific elements of work, rather than relying on a subcommittee to review a standard in its entirety. The introduction of a Code of Conduct that identifies conflicts of interests has also been a positive step. This allows stakeholders to withdraw from participation when they might be conflicted and also empowers the committee to raise a potential conflict before it occurs.

SA: What do you think is in the future of standardisation?
BH: I would like to see more performance-based metrics than prescription-based. This is important to ensure safety in design and in the workplace while allowing technology and innovation to differentiate products and practices. CICA supports Standards Australia’s increased involvement in International Standards. As the unfortunate reduction in Australian manufacturing occurs we will be required to accept products as-built from overseas. Standards Australia having its finger on the pulse of ISO standards will provide Australia with a voice of influence.

Technical Governance Review


Standards Australia has commenced a technical governance review of its standards development process. Cameron Ralph Khoury have been appointed as independent consultants to assist with the review.

The Standards Australia Review of Technical Governance Issues Paper (PDF) provides further details. Submissions accepted until 22 September 2017.

Future Development of Onsite Battery Storage Standard


 
On 15 August 2017 Standards Australia concluded public consultation on the draft battery storage standard that has been in development for some time.

Over three thousand comments were received on the draft with many relating to a single issue of how systems should be installed in a residential context.

Standards Australia will continue to work with its technical committee and all stakeholders on this issue and hopes that a parallel policy dialogue will give the technical committee the guidance it needs to progress the technical work.

Read more in our media statement (PDF).

New Meeting Rooms At Standards Australia


We are excited to announce the opening of our new meeting room facilities for committee members starting on 30 August 2017.

The new facilities will be located on level 9, 20 Bridge Street and provide our contributors with:
Additional meeting rooms
Meetings rooms with capacity to accommodate larger groups
Enhanced and flexible audio visual (AV) and other technology to support productive face-to-face and virtual meetings

Project managers will send further details directly to committees via email.

We look forward to seeing you in our new meeting rooms spaces!

Submitting a Project Proposal


 
We are still accepting proposals to amend, revise or develop new Australian Standards until Wednesday 20 September 2017.

You can learn about proposing a project on our website, or speak to one of our Stakeholder Engagement Managers.

Revision of Standard for Plugs and Socket Outlets


 
Today Standards Australia completed the development of AS/NZS 3112:2017, Approval and test specification—Plugs and socket-outlets. AS/NZS 3112 is the principle standard for plugs and sockets used in Australia and New Zealand.

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

Welcoming our 2017–18 Young Leaders


 
This month Standards Australia kicked off the 2017–18 Young Leaders Program. After receiving the highest number of applications yet, we have doubled our intake for the program to 20 participants.

See our program page for details. Questions can be emailed to Young.Leaders@standards.org.au

Indonesia–Australia Standards Mapping Project


As part of our standards mapping study with Indonesia, we are seeking feedback to identify opportunities for enhanced standards harmonisation, technical alignment and regulatory coherence.

Please complete our survey by 4 September 2017.
 
     
 
 
 

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from July 2017 (PDF):

CEN-CENELEC releases their first ‘On the Spot’ newsletter
Improving the customer experience with new standards for call centres just published
IEC work on cyber security for energy infrastructure

Sector Updates


Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment


The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.
 
 
 
 

Procurement Rules Big Win for Australian Standards


LANDMARK changes to the commonwealth’s procurement rules (CPRs), which came into effect on March 1 this year, are a win for Australian Standards.

The changes are of significant importance to the building industry and in particular Australian producers and manufacturers who provide products to the sector.

More than $59 billion is spent on federal procurements each year.

The changes add strength and impetus to a whole suite of standards and certification systems that accompany products and services provided by Australia’s timber, forests, wood panel and furniture sectors.

The new government procurement rules are firmly based on federal requirement policies that centre on legality and third-party certification – with non-compliance attracting hefty fines.

Rules that must be complied with in undertaking procurement are denoted by the term ‘must’. Non-corporate commonwealth entities must report non-compliance with the rules of the CPRs through the federal compliance reporting process.

Non-compliance with the requirements of the resource management framework, including in relation to procurement, may attract a range of criminal, civil or administrative remedies under the Public Service Act 1999 and the Crimes Act 1914.

Introducing the revisions, the Minister for Finance Senator Mathias Cormann said the commonwealth procurement rules were the keystone of the government’s procurement policy framework.

“They are supported by a range of tools including guidance material and templates developed by the Department of Finance to ensure accountability and transparency, and reduce the costs and complexity of conducting business with the government,” Senator Cormann said.

“Flexibility within the rules provides opportunities for innovation, access to government contracts, and the ability for officials to design processes that reflect the size, scope and risk of the procurement,” he said.

“The framework reflects officials’ responsibilities, including under the PGPA Act and Australia’s international obligations, and factors that must be considered in meeting the core rule of achieving value for money.”

The changes were negotiated by Senator Nick Xenophon, who labelled the amendments a “sea change” and “unambiguously good for Australian industry”.

Senator Xenophon said the revisions were the most significant change to the way the Australian government purchased goods and services the country had ever seen.

Revision of Quality Care Community Pharmacy Standard


The Pharmacy Guild of Australia is pleased to announce the publication of the revised AS 85000:2017, Quality Care Community Pharmacy Standard. We thank the multi-disciplinary standards committee that actively participated in the review process to ensure the revised standard is practical while also promoting innovation and growth within the community pharmacy sector.

This standard provides guidance for the design, implementation and continuous improvement of a community pharmacy quality management system. A structured management system supports the provision of consistent and high-quality pharmacy health services that will contribute to positive health outcomes for the diverse Australian community. This standard also underpins the Community Pharmacy Accreditation system.