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October 2017 Edition

 

CEO Report: Standardising Diversity

2017 Annual Review: Vision into Action

Future Cities Forum: Smart, Connected and Sustainable

In Conversation with Adam Beck

Trialling New Presentation of Drafts to Public

Increasing Body Coverage for Better Skin Protection

Aged Standards Open for Review

 

Project Prioritisation: Round 15 Wrap Up

Bitumen Standards Forum

Upcoming Webinar for New Committee Members

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

AFS Welcomes Federal Support of Australia’s Forest Standards

CEO Report: Standardising Diversity


 
As CEO I like to reconnect with our Mission and Vision on a regular basis. Following the successful ISO and IEC annual meetings I was again reminded of the importance of our Mission:

To excel in the provision of contemporary, internationally aligned Australian Standards and related services.

The significance of our international engagement is evident from Australia’s expert contributors’ active participation in ISO and IEC and their joint committees JTC 1 and JTC 2. In FY 2016/17 we participated in 258 ISO committees, 86 IEC committees and 11 JTC 1/JTC 2 committees.

Equally, our international engagement extends to hosting international experts in Australia. Just this month we hosted five international committees in four cities across Australia. Topics have ranged from 5G wireless technology to photography and photographic equipment.

In October the IEC held the 2017 General Meeting in Vladivostok, Russia with the theme ‘standardising diversity’ – a theme that means everything from remaining true to our heritage while embracing new sectors, right through to making sure we create opportunities for Young Professionals to join our experienced leaders in the Australian IEC Delegation.

Every standards organisation is assessing their readiness to serve their communities. IEC is doing this through the IEC Master Plan (PDF), a focus of the Vladivostok meeting.

Vladivostok was also the location for the ISO/IEC JTC 1 Plenary Session. This meeting progressed work on new IT areas such as artificial intelligence, 3D printing and 3D scanning technologies. I would particularly like to acknowledge and applaud the dedication and commitment of Australia’s delegations to the IEC and JTC 1 meetings.

Our participation in international standardisation is a vital element to allow us to maintain a strong Australian input into the global standards and conformance system.

My sincere thanks to everyone involved in the work of Standards Australia. Every committee contributor active in both national and international standards projects, every expert who joins in our work and every nominating organisation and business who supports what we do. Because by excelling in the provision of contemporary, internationally aligned Australian Standards and related services we all contribute to the net benefit of the Australian community and economy. Thank you.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

2017 Annual Review: Vision into Action


 
Standards Australia’s 2017 Annual Review is now available on our website. Building on a theme of vision into action, we set out the last 12 months of milestones, contributions, production numbers, together with our financial report for the last financial year.

A soft copy is available here (PDF).

Future Cities Forum: Smart, Connected and Sustainable


 
Standards Australia organised and hosted a forum to mark World Standards Day and its 2017 theme of ‘standards make cities smarter’. The forum, titled ‘Future Cities: Smart, Connected and Sustainable’, featured a range of high calibre speakers and was hosted in partnership with the Smart Cities Council Australia New Zealand, Australian Smart Communities Association, Internet of Things Alliance Australia (IoTAA), the City of Sydney, and Webb Henderson Legal and Regulatory Advisors.

The key objective of this forum was to identify the standardisation needs in the smart cities space, and seek agreement for the development of a roadmap. Over 40 participants, ranging from SMEs, large businesses, nominating organisations, local government, federal government, as well as Standards Australia’s own technical committees participated.

In Conversation with Adam Beck


 
Adam Beck is the Founding Executive Director of Smart Cities Council Australia New Zealand, an organisation dedicated to accelerating sustainability outcomes in cities and towns through the adoption of technology, data and intelligent design. He is also an Ambassador with Portland-based think tank EcoDistricts, where he was previously Director of Innovation.

Standards Australia: You recently presented at ‘Future Cities: Smart, Connected and Sustainable – A Forum for World Standards Day’. What were the key takeaways from your presentation?
Adam Beck: It is critical that we build a culture of embracing standards in Australia, to enable us to build a common language around smart cities, determine what success looks like, and catalyse transformation across the smart cities sector. Only when we have these things in place can coordinated and sustained action and implementation advance.

SA: What will the cities of our future look like?
AB: I think they will look a lot like they do now, but we will have a more advanced ‘invisible’ layer embedded – a digital layer. The Internet of Things will bring new conditions that will allow our cities to thrive, as we gather real time data in a ubiquitous way, and translate that into insights and intelligence that afford better decision making. Much of this will be invisible, but it won’t go unnoticed.

SA: How will standards support this vision?
AB: Standards will specify the operating protocols for this new digital layer of the City, as well as providing an overall framework for building the leadership, governance, vision and capacity to attract investment that will be required.

SA: What is the Australian approach to smart cities?
AB: I hope it is going to be one that is meaningful, in that it makes sense for the government entities advancing the agenda. Our approach also needs to be a compassionate one, to ensure we build opportunity for our community’s most vulnerable, and that we leave no one behind.

SA: Which countries/cities are setting examples for us internationally?
AB: There is a long list of global exemplars that continue to inspire, from Amsterdam to Singapore, and Adelaide to Boston. Many are advancing a smart cities agenda, but from different perspectives and with new emerging models. Being open to sharing and peer exchange is critical, and I hope that we can develop a culture of collective impact, rather than isolated impact.

Trialling New Presentation of Drafts to Public


In a first for Standards Australia, proposed revisions to AS/NZS 3500, Plumbing and Drainage (series), will be presented with the changes tracked to assist contributors in understanding what has changed from the previous edition.

We hope this will simplify the public comment process. Let us know your thoughts by contacting Stakeholder Engagement Manager for the Water and Waste services sector, Ron Pulido at ron.pulido@standards.org.au

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

Increasing Body Coverage for Better Skin Protection


 
Standards Australia recently completed the revision of AS/NZS 4399:2017, Sun protective clothing—Evaluation and classification.

The standard now includes a new requirement specifying the minimum amount of body surface that must be covered in order to make an ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) claim.

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

Aged Standards Open for Review


Standards Australia periodically reviews standards over ten years of age to ensure our catalogue remains contemporary and relevant.

We are currently seeking committee member and broader stakeholder views on the proposed withdrawal of a set of standards and other publications.

View the list of proposed standards for withdrawal on the Aged Standards page.

Project Prioritisation: Round 15 Wrap Up


Standards Australia’s 15th round of Project Prioritisation closed last month. We received 86 proposals for a total of 172 projects, which can be viewed on our Sector Updates page.

All projects will then be considered by the Standards Development and Accreditation Committee (SDAC) at its upcoming meeting in November.

Upcoming Events

Bitumen Standards Forum


 
Standards Australia has received project proposals to revise a number of standards covering bitumen and related products for roadmaking. To progress these proposals, we will facilitate a forum to discuss the scope of work and ensure wide stakeholder support.

All interested stakeholders are encouraged to attend the forum to be held on Tuesday 28 November 2017 in Melbourne.

To learn more or register please view the event invite (PDF).

Contributor Corner

Upcoming Webinar for New Committee Members


 
Are you a new committee member? Are you looking for an opportunity to ask important questions and delve into relevant key concepts? Then the upcoming webinar on Tuesday 12 December 2017 is a must! Remember to register your attendance in the Standards Australia Academy to receive the Skype meeting invite, and complete the online induction program prior to attending.

Updates

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from September 2017 (PDF):

Celebrating World Standards Day 2017
A new work item proposal – consumer protection: Privacy by design for consumer goods and services
Why low voltage direct current is the future

Sector Updates

Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

SDO News: reports from other developers of Australian Standards

AFS Welcomes Federal Support of Australia’s Forest Standards


 
Looking over HQPlantations’ operations at Beerburrum on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast are Michelle McAndrew, sustainability manager, HQP, Ross Garsden of BSI Australia, and Simon Dorries, CEO, AFS Ltd. AFS is the most widely used forest certification standard in Australia.
Australian Forestry Standard Ltd has welcomed the federal government’s assurance that forest certification continues to guarantee the legality of national domestic wood supply. Federal Minister responsible for forestry Senator Anne Ruston has announced that amendments to illegal logging legislation will streamline and simplify the importation and processing of timber products certified under Australian forest certification schemes.

As Australia’s largest certification program for sustainable forest management with more than 24 million ha certified, AFS is the Australian member of PEFC, the world's largest forest certification system.

“The government is to be congratulated on its continued tough stance on illegal logging and recognition that major forestry operations in Australia are 100% independently certified under Australian standards,” AFS CEO Simon Dorries said.

“Government and public building authorities are placing greater emphasis on Australian standards in their regulations to ensure the sustainability, environmental security and legality of products used in the housing and construction industries,” he said.

“Chain of custody is especially suited to projects such as new-build commercial and office buildings, private and social housing projects, renovation and refurbishment schemes, and civil engineering projects.”

Mr Dorries said the simple act of sourcing or purchasing an Australian-branded product could have far-reaching positive implications, not least in terms of sustainable consumption, arguing that improving the productivity and profitability of forests and trees was central to achieving sustainability across landscapes and livelihoods.

AFPA CEO Ross Hampton said illegal logging regulations should be effective but not impose unnecessary red tape and compliance costs on Australian producers who were doing the right thing and already operated within a stringent legal and compliance framework for sustainable forest management.

“Australian major forestry operations are 100% independently certified; nowhere is native forest or plantation management more sustainable,” Mr Hampton said.