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January 2018 Edition

 

CEO Report: Stars of Standards

In Conversation with Jason Brown

Project Prioritisation Round 16

Standards Australia Nationwide Seminars

Australia's Termite Management Standard Revised

Support for Australian Standards voiced at Senate Committee Hearing

New Handbook for Document Control

 

Upcoming Learning Opportunities

International Update

Sector Updates

Drafts Open for Comment

AS 7711, Signalling Principles

Amendment to AS 4707:2014, Chain of Custody for Forest Products

Where Next for PEFC? Nations Have Their Say

CEO Report: Stars of Standards


Welcome to the first E-News of 2018.

We are entering another year delivering exciting new tools and ways of working that will make us easier to work with—whether you are a committee contributor, a nominating organisation, an interested standards user or a first time subscriber to E-News.

I say that because of all the innovative work we did in 2017. By ‘we’, I mean the outstanding team at Standards Australia. At our end-of-year celebration we recognised our Stars of Standards who went above and beyond to make a difference.

 
Let me introduce the stars of 2017:

Star of Standards Award
Kate Fraser, Learning and Development Manager
(Pictured, right)

CEO Special Commendation Awards
Olesya Bayliss-McCulloch, Legal Counsel
Moitri Pal, Program Manager
Clare Hobern, Project Manager

The efforts and impacts of these individuals, and countless others within the organisation, made for a successful 2017, and my team will continue to drive progress in 2018. We already have many exciting projects on the agenda to make us simpler, faster and better to work with.

In the coming weeks you can anticipate our new external website, built on a modern content management system with many functionalities previously not possible. When we go live with the site I encourage you to submit your feedback to the team, no matter what your level of involvement is with us.

There are many other important projects underway, such as the development of the contributor portal, enhancements to our digital repository (SIM) and testing new possibilities through our Incubator.

We will continue to update you as these initiatives evolve. In the meantime, if you ever have any questions about our work and the enhancements we are delivering, please speak to me, your Project Manager, your Stakeholder Engagement Manager, or any other member of the Standards Australia team.

Wishing you all a successful 2018.

—Dr Bronwyn Evans, CEO

In Conversation with Jason Brown


 
Jason Brown is the National Security Director for Thales in Australia and New Zealand. He is responsible for international trade and security liaison with government, law enforcement and intelligence communities and compliance with requirements for trade control, national security and relevant federal and state laws. He is Chair of MB-025, Security and Resilience, which mirrors the international committee ISO/TC 292, and Chair of the international committee ISO/TC 262, Risk Management.

Standards Australia: Tell us about the upcoming ISO/TC 292 meeting in Sydney. Why is this event important?
Jason Brown: ISO/TC 292 manages international standardisation in the field of security to enhance the safety and resilience of society. The committee is made up of over 50 member countries and we look after more than 20 published International Standards. The meeting in March will include all of the relevant working groups, covering areas including emergency management, developing countries, business continuity and protective security.

SA: How do standards provide solutions for the challenges in your sector?
JB: Our modern world is facing a broad scope of challenges, ranging from natural disasters to terrorism. These threats can arise at any time and in any place. Standards help people, communities and organisations prepare and respond immediately and effectively. Standards achieve interoperability and cooperation in areas vital to security and, ultimately, survival.

SA: What expertise in security does Australia bring to international standards development?
JB: Australia has significant policy and process in place for dealing with security issues. Participation in international standardisation presents an opportunity to share Australian best practice to improve the safety and security of people all over the world.

Project Prioritisation Round 16


Round 16 of Standards Australia's Project Prioritisation will open on Monday 5 February 2018, with applications accepted until 5pm Wednesday 7 March 2018.

Detailed information can be found on our website:
Proposing a Project: http://bit.ly/Proposing-a-project
Project Proposal form: http://bit.ly/SA-project-proposal (Word Doc).
Please ensure you use version 4.1, issued on 28 March 2017
Guide to Net Benefit: http://bit.ly/SA-Net-Benefit
Prioritisation and selection of projects: http://bit.ly/SA-Prioritisation

Should you, your nominating organisation or committee be considering submitting a project proposal, we encourage you to contact a Stakeholder Engagement Manager as early as possible. Your early communication will enable the Standards Australia team to provide any required assistance in advance of submission deadlines.

Standards Australia Nationwide Seminars


 
Standards Australia’s Stakeholder Engagement Managers will be travelling across the country providing an overview of Standards Australia and our strategic vision, insights on how standards are developed and how you can get involved, international standards development activity, and standards development organisation accreditation pathways.

In our 2018 program we are excited to include an opportunity to learn more about Standards Australia's Incubator, our hub for testing novel and innovative solutions to customer and contributor needs. We're looking to gather feedback and ideas on how we can better create standards into the future that are more inclusive, easier to access and reach the market more rapidly.

Upcoming seminars
Sydney, 14 February
Register →
Hobart, 15 February
Register →
Melbourne, 16 February
Register →
Darwin, 16 February
Register →
Canberra, 20 February
Register →
Brisbane, 22 February
Register →
Perth, 28 February
Register →
Adelaide, 7 March
Register →

Further questions can be emailed to sem@standards.org.au

Australia's Termite Management Standard Revised


 
Standards Australia recently published a revision of AS 3660.2-2017, Termite management Part 2: In and around existing buildings and structures.

This standard works with AS 3660.1-2014, Termite management Part 1: New building work, providing tools to manage termite risks to both existing structures and after construction of new buildings.

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

Support for Australian Standards voiced at Senate Committee Hearing


 
Extreme weather events and natural hazards are a growing concern in Australia and have an impact on the lives of people, communities – and their property. Late last year, Standards Australia appeared before the Senate Environment and Communications References Committee to profile the role of standards in the building and construction arena, in light of these natural hazards.

Standards Australia has facilitated the development of over 100 standards underpinning the National Construction Code (NCC), with other dedicated standards in related areas, including utilities. All of this is achieved with strong contributor input. These standards are pivotal in the development of Australia’s infrastructure, and are prescribed, to varying degrees, in State and Territory laws.

We spoke to a few key standards pertaining to extreme weather events and natural hazards – namely AS 4055-2012, Wind loads for housing, and AS 3959-2009, Construction of buildings in bushfire-prone areas – which are referenced in the National Construction Code. Our appearance before the Committee also provided us with an opportunity to acknowledge the ground-breaking work of our committees in relation to the Water Efficiency Labelling Scheme (WELS). This is not just of national, but international importance, if we look at the very real challenges facing other global cities facing severe water management challenges right now.

New Handbook for Document Control


 
Separate from recordkeeping and document management, document control addresses the entire life cycle of business critical documents. The new handbook SA/SNZ HB 168:2017, Document Control, provides guidelines for processes and systems for implementing an effective document control program.

Learn more in our media release (PDF).

Contributor Corner

Upcoming Learning Opportunities


Would you like to reach consensus faster? Get the knowledge and skills you need from the Standards Australia Academy. We have upcoming workshops and webinars which include digital programs that you complete when and where you are ready to start learning.

After logging in click "Webinars + Workshops" to see all upcoming learning events starting February 2018:
Workshops: How to Write an Australian Standard
Webinars: Welcome to the World of Standards (committee member induction)

Make sure you complete the pre-learning before the workshop or webinar. Places are limited, don't miss out!

Updates

International Update


Standards Australia represents Australia on the two major international standards development bodies, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Our activities are reported on our International Updates page.

Highlights from December 2017 (PDF):

New initiatives on electronic commerce, investment facilitation and MSMEs
A New Field of Technical Activity – Occupational Health and Safety Management
New edition of ISO/IEC 17025 just published

Sector Updates

Read about the latest standards development news in your industry sector on our Sector Updates page.

Drafts Open for Comment

The public comment process provides an opportunity for stakeholders and members of the public to make valuable contributions. View draft standards currently open for comment.

SDO News: reports from other developers of Australian Standards

AS 7711, Signalling Principles


The Rail Industry Safety and Standards Board (RISSB) is inviting anyone with an interest in rail signalling to share their views on draft AS 7711, Signalling Principles, by Tuesday 6 February 2018.

To access the draft, please download it here: AS 7711, Signalling Principles Draft (PDF).

To make comments, please use the commenting tools in Adobe Acrobat or Acrobat Reader to comment in-line with the text.

 
Please return your PDF with comments to jcampbell@rissb.com.au by COB 6th February 2018.

Amendment to AS 4707:2014, Chain of Custody for Forest Products


The following amendment is proposed to address a drafting error that potentially affects some certified organisations.

Appendix 2, Implementation of the chain of custody standard by multi-site organisations

Delete Paragraph 2.6:

The producer group is limited to participation of sites which are domiciled in a single state and which have no more than 100 employees (full time employees equivalent) and a turnover of maximum A$25,000,000.

and replace with the following:

The producer group is limited to participation of sites which are domiciled in a single country and which have no more than 100 employees (full time employees equivalent) and a turnover of maximum A$25,000,000.

The word 'country' appears in this clause in the Program for Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) chain of custody for forest products standard on which AS 4707 is based. That word was inadvertently changed to state when the PEFC standard was adapted for Australia. The change may have arisen due to misunderstanding of the significance of state and country in the context of the European Union, where PEFC originates.

The purpose of this clause is to prevent large companies from grouping together to avoid individual certification. This purpose is achieved by the restrictions on numbers of employees and on turnover. The restriction on operating in a single state in Australia is therefore unnecessarily restrictive in Australia, where businesses commonly operate in more than one state. Comments may be addressed to: info@responsiblewood.org.au or to: Responsible Wood, PO Box 786, New Farm QLD 4005.

Comments will be accepted until 28 February 2018.

Where Next for PEFC? Nations Have Their Say


The 22nd PEFC General Assembly early in December closed with voices from the future, as countries actively developing national forest certification standards systems took to the floor.

This year Croatia, Kenya, Myanmar, The Philippines and Vietnam all seized the opportunity to share their views.

"We are in the process of developing and formulating forest certification in the Philippines," Dr Priscila Dolom, University of the Philippines, announced.

"We started in 2014 and have since formed our interim national governing body. A technical working group has crafted a forest certification standard and we're working on a chain-of-custody standard based on the requirements of PEFC (Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification)."

Tran Lam Dong, Vietnam Academy of Forest Sciences, said since a national forest certification system was established in 2016, the country had conducted research and begun work on our forest management and chain of custody standards.

"An important step for us now is to get approval from our government for the proposal of the system development, after which we can apply to become a PEFC member."

"In Kenya, we do not yet have any national standard for forest certification - we are beginning from scratch," Geoffrey Wanyama, Farm Forestry Smallholder Producers Association of Kenya, said at the assembly.

"Attending PEFC Week gave me the opportunity to learn what other countries are doing. To me this is an enlightening experience."